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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alrighty, this is the problem I'm having.

Bike runs well, really well. Idles fine, revs great, carbs are in sync, even runs decent cold, as in don't need a lot of choke to get it running, once warmed up. Look out, it's as strong as ever.

But...

When it's being ridden, sometimes, but not always, when you close the throttle after having it under load it will just die. Push the starter and it will start right back up and idle just fine.

I was having a vacuum leak. Today I eliminated the tube to the #1 and #4 carbs. Capped them and the small outlet on the 'vacuum' switch valve.

I also pulled the long tubes from each side of the air box since they ran to the bottom of the bike but were plugged anyway (makes assembly much faster).

Facts:
- Carbs are new to me but were freshly rebuilt.
- It runs better than I've ever felt it.
- Throttle cable is clean, smooth and not hanging.
- It's not the petcock, or the fuel pump. Petcock flows fuel just fine.
- New fuel filter.


Someone on another board mentioned the slides might be sticking. If that's the case, how do you fix that?

-MD
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
To clarify, here's what I did today:



I simply removed the 'T' from the Air Valve. Capped it at the valve and at Carb #1 and #4.

It runs great. Starts fine, parked I can rev it, it will idle just fine.

Riding it though is a different story... After use under load, (take off, shift to 2nd, or 3rd... Grab the clutch, close the throttle, and boom rpm's drop like you'd expect but it stalls instead of idles. It will start right back up and idle.

It almost acts fuel starved but I know I've got plenty of fuel, the petcock works fine as does the fuel pump...

*thoughts anyone?*

I suspected a vacuum leak and took a racers advise to "remove all that shit" so I did. It runs well, as long as you don't need it to idle when you stop, which unfortunately, I do...

:/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The tubes on each side of the airbox are drain tubes. They should be used. They are plugged becasue when riding, the airbox is pressurized (ram air) so you need to keep the air in the airbox, not let it leak out and that's what it'll do without those tubes in place. During an oil change or occasionally, pull the plugs off the ends of the drain tubes and let anything in there drain out. I've never had any liquid come out of my drain tubes but a few dead bugs and some dust did.

To check the slides you need to pull the tank and airbox off. Look through the carb throat and you'll see the slides. Lift them up gently with you finger to feel if there is a littl resistance. Then let them drop. They should all feel the same. While you're there, pull the black carb tops off (4 screws each) and you'll see the diapragms attached to the slides. Check to make sure none are torn, damaged, pinched, etc... You can easily pull the diphrams out and the slides and needles will come with them. Check the slide and diaphram condition. You'll also be able to see if the needles are stock or aftermarket.

To easily get rid of the entire air valve assembly, you can just run a tube from the from one of the reed valve hose nipples to the other thereby connecting the two together. You'll then need to plug the hole in the airbox from the other air valve hose. The correct way to loose the air valve is to remove the valve cover and drill and tap the two air intake holes so you can install a couple of small set screws using loktite on the threads.

I removed the 'long' tubes which were plugged, but capped the airbox. The lower drain that has the catch thing/filter on it, is still in place. I can put them back though...

So are you saying to properly remove the air valve I should also 'cap' the big hose that connects it to the airbox? and the airbox itself (assuming I don't perform surgery?)

Will leaving the big hose connected contribute to my issue?

-thanks.
 
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