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I always recommend the Kawasaki 250R for novice riders. Here's why:

1- It's agility, high maneuvering ability due to its thin tires and lightweight.
2- Its low torque and limited engine power which is preferable for entry level riders.

What are your thoughts guys? Any unique "selling points" for this model to new riders? Share your thoughts with me :grin2:
 

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I think everyone ought to learn to ride initially on a small bike of some sort. Once a person is familiar with the control functions, can balance, start and stop without falling over, then it's time to consider purchase. Learning to ride on one's first (owned) motorcycle is ok, but often once the rider is a little more confident, they can pick out a machine that fits them and their intended riding parameters. Without knowing anything about what you'll actually want out of a riding experience, buyers remorse can set in pretty quickly when one realizes the machine they've purchased won't do what they want.
 

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Good bike to learn and practice how to countersteer correctly, controlling throttle and well if it falls, you can pick it up easier. I can't tell you how many people didn't know how to countersteer when I took the Keith Code Superbike school.
 

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Small bikes will be easier to learn basic control skills as the others have stated. But they will also help you hone your skills even further even if you're a seasoned/skilled rider. They teach you higher corner speeds and how to keep your momentum up as well as rhythm and being smooth. I've ridden and raced all sizes of bikes but still find the smaller ones the most fun because of this. My last race bike was an 95 Honda RS125 2 stroke that I would beat up on 600's on shorter courses. And after not being on a track in 16+ years I recently purchased an 09 250R to keep in Cali for track days. And I loved it at Chuckwalla. I got hammered on the straights by everybody but in the corners not so much :D Bear in mind also that I had never ridden this bike before this event on the 8th of this month, nor had I ever ridden this track or any others in 16 years.


https://youtu.be/esmod0hEOSw
 

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I always recommend the Kawasaki 250R for novice riders. Here's why:

1- It's agility, high maneuvering ability due to its thin tires and lightweight.
2- Its low torque and limited engine power which is preferable for entry level riders.

What are your thoughts guys? Any unique "selling points" for this model to new riders? Share your thoughts with me :grin2:
I completely agree.
 

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Out of curiosity at what age can you legally start riding on the roads in the US? In the uk you can ride a 50cc at the age of 16, limited to a lame 28mph!!
 

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At 16, you get your driver's license in Illinois and you can test for "motor-driven cycles" which is anything between 50cc and 175cc. At 18, you can take your regular motorcycle test and get an "M" classification. The sub-175 classification is "L" 50cc machines can be ridden with a regular license, no L or M required. Every State is different. Next door in Missouri, no license at all to ride 50cc on the street. Also those vehicles are not required to be licensed or titled in Missouri.
 

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Thanks, amazing how laws can vary so much from state to state but then the USA is after all not a single country but of course a country comprised of a unison of states, not something I've ever really stopped to think about it, easy to just take the USA as a homogenous whole and forgetting how different each state and its laws can be.

Cheers.
 

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Things sure have changed over the years in Illinois.
150cc was the dividing point between class L and M
I was 16 and took a written and riding test on a 250cc and got my class M
and your driver's license was paper
 

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I learned on a '99 Katana 750. It was heavy as a first bike to learn on. I learned real quick how to pick it up when I laid it down. I learned how not to lay it down even quicker. 250cc/300cc are perfect sizes for learning and some highway riding. 500cc-800cc parallel twin engines are great as well for first bikes and will last well after the first 6 mos. of riding.
 

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My first real streetbike was a new at the time 1993 ninja 250. It was the perfect bike to learn on. I had a lot of fun on that bike only had it for one summer but it was so much fun.
 

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In R.I. you have to take a motorcycle course then you can ride whatever you want . Started all the boys on gpz 550 . They all ride 636 now except for the oldest who rides a zrx . Started the first wife on a 250 she rode it one summer and sold it . She never rode after that . Current wife bought a gpz 550 new in 83 she still rides it . My oldest started his girl on a 250 she rode it one summer and sold it for a kaw 650 . The 250 was too slow she couldn't keep up .
 

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It depends, The original question is why I recommend a 250. Are we to assume we went to some remote desert and under some rock found a person that had never seen a street bike? I think most people that have any desire to ride on the street have already ridden a dirt bike. Im sure most started riding at 9 10 years old.
I remember in 9th grade a guy had a Honda CB 550. I talked him into letting me take it for a ride, I thought that thing was bad ass wicked fast. They all seam that way out of 1 st and 2 nd. But as we all know the smaller the motor the weaker they are accelerating in 3 rd 4th 5th.

I have seen a lot of guys buy a 650 only to realize after 6 months they made a big mistake and now have to buy another bike.

I got my fist street bike at 27 years old and it was an 85 kawi zx 900. I bought it and road it home that night. Road it until I got my 1st speeding ticket then went and took the test to get my M. Im sure now a days you get pulled over with no M and they tow your bike, so I wouldn't recommend doing it in that order.

Anyone that has asked me what they should get for there 1 st bike I would tell them nothing smaller then a 750.
Just my 2 cents.
 
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