Kawasaki Ninja ZX Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see alot of you guys talk about "track days"
Is this a special event? Or is there times you can go to local tracks and just rip it?
Ive tried google searching for a track near me. How would i find out about this. Im In Illinois, if anyone knows tracks around me i could tear up id GREATLY appreciate it!

Thanks!

(sorry if this seems dumb to some people but id love to ride a track and dont know of any)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
ive never been, but im assuming track days refers to days they goto the track that is open to the public for a fee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Most trackdays are organised by biking schools, dealers, or track owners and is open for the public to come and ride on the track for a fee.

Don't know how it is organised there by you guys, but here in South Africa, most are organised by biking schools or dealers.
They then devide the guys up, usually in four groups A,B,C and D groups, with the 'D'-group usually for beginners and they allocate an "instructor/marshall" for every 8-10 riders to keep an eye on them and to regulate the slower from the faster guys.
The "c"-group is for riders who is starting to feel comfortable on the track and for riders with pillions.
Group 'B' is for the "streetracer" guys or the guys who think they can really ride well, and most of the falls usually come from this group.
Group 'A' is for the guys who know they can ride well or are regional competitors.
These are usually very well controlled and each group is allowed 10 laps per session.
There are always flag marshalls and emergency services present and after having done 3 of these track days, I strongly recommend them and keep the racing off the streets!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Trackdays are a big thing here in England and I've done many of them over the last 15 years. Some here are organised by dealers but most are done by companies who specialise in them and there are also race schools as well. Many of the specialist companies and race schools are run by or involve ex or current racers.

Some of the best trackdays I've been on were organised by an internet biking group I used to belong to similar to these forums. We would just hire the circuits for a day or two inclusive of marshalls and medical care. We had an offshoot racing group as well and many of them would come on the days as extra practise time. They were also always willing to give up some time to show others the way around or to follow you and give you advice. A lot of us would only ever meet each other for the track days but seeing as we 'knew' each other there was always a lot of respect out on the circuit and we would give each other room etc.

Anyway, here's my top tips for your first track day;

1. Make sure your tires and brakes are in top condition. You can easily destroy a set of tires and pads in a days track riding. If it's hot and you're on it you may find it beneficial to drop your tires a couple of PSI. Just remember to increase them again before going back on the road.
2. If the circuit is any distance away get yourself a motel or something for the night before and the night after. You really want to be fresh to get the best out of the day and you'll be surprised how tiring it will be.
3. When you first get there seek out the organisers and see if there are any experienced riders there happy to show a newbie the way around. You'll learn loads more in one 20 minute session than half a day trying to learn the circuit on your own.
4. Take your time in the first session to build up to it and use the last session as a wind down. A lot of riders try too hard in the first session or try desperately in the last session to set their fastest times with inevitable consequences.
5. If you feel the group you are in are too fast / slow don't be afraid to go to the organisers and ask to move groups.
6. Stick to your own pace. Their are some seriously quick guys out there and the 'well if they can go that fast...' mentality only leads to one thing.
7. If you find yourself stuck behind a slower group of riders at any point just drop back and make yourself some room to play in rather than trying to force your way through them.
8. HAVE FUN!!! Trackdays are a great way to explore yours and your bikes capabilities in a relatively safe environment. Just don't forget what the limits are and bring yourself and you machine back in one piece.

Oh yeah, you'll be buzzing for days afterwards :crazyloco
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
Good advice above.

"6. Stick to your own pace. Their are some seriously quick guys out there and the 'well if they can go that fast...' mentality only leads to one thing."

The funniest thing I've seen at a track day was a bloke on a 125GP bike with a whole stack of litre bikes behind him. They could get him in 2s and 3s on the straights but he carried better corner speed and would pull away on the corners.
gammac
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I've only ever been to one myself. But it's firmly cemented in my mind the fact that riding is ALL about the rider, and has next to nothing to do with the bike. I was out there on a little Hornet (600cc naked standard) and I managed to whomp the shit out of a bunch of guys on liter bikes. And I was getting my ass kicked by my boss on a super-moto. Haha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Make sure you unplug or pull the fuse to your headlight. If you do not when you cover it with tape it will get hot and the tape becomes bonded to the plastic and it will be a pain to remove.

Also make sure you have valid health insurance.

As said above do not try an be cool and impress anyone just take it slow. Speed comes with track time and experience.

To hard, to fast almost always ends in a premature end to your day and a wrecked bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
Great stuff listed above. I'd also like say that taking an instructional class such as Lee Parks' Total Control Riding Clinic http://www.webbikeworld.com/motorcycle-training/total-control/advanced-riding-clinic.htm will guarentee you'll have a better track day experience than if you just paid an entry fee and went out and blasted around the track on your own.

If you've ever tried to snowboard or learn to snow ski on your own, you know what I mean. Just learning the basics will significantly reduce the risk of you blowing through a corner or having a bad slide out. You're going to pay some money for the track time regardless if you get a lesson or not, but I think its really worth the extra money to get some instruction on your very first track day and hopefully keep you from starting some bad habits that are harder to break later. After that, you can go back and keep practicing what you've already learned. Best of luck.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top