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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello id like to start off with my zx6r 2002 having starting issues. It would seem to be an issue relating to the battery. However the bike battery was tested and I have been told it is perfectly fine. I tested the voltage of the battery upon start the bike was at a 12v during turnover. Major leak from the exhaust connect bottom of motorcycle. Here is a link to a video description of my bike and the sounds it makes with a futher description of the issue.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lr3lAYcGMF0&feature=youtu.be

Info would be excellent thank you in advance!
 

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OK please stop trying to start the bike. Here is what needs to be done. Pull all spark plugs and turn it over by hand. Feel for anything binding or catching. You will feel resistance from the camshafts pushing the valves down but no worries. After you have cleared all the fuel from the cylinders (how do I know they are full you ask? Fuel running out of the header), take the carbs off and procede to clean them. It looks like your floats are sticking open, and fuel is just pouring into the engine. I would also change your oil given as how it is probably full of fuel.
Next after you have cleaned the carbs and most likely replaced the float needles and seats, clean all electrical connectors. Starter relay, battery cables at the starter and solenoid. Check your grounds. Then try to turn the bike over with the starter (plugs and carbs should still be off at this point with fresh oil and filter). If it works, then replace carbs, and plugs, and start. DO NOT MESS WITH ANYTHING BUT THE FLOAT NEEDLES AND SEATS. Next put the fuel petcock in PRIME (should say PRI) and attempt to start the bike. It should start after a few tries. Put bike together and ride. PM me if you need help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow seems to be a little project. I will do what I can tomorrow. Thanks for the info ill keep you posted
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have to wait till Monday in order to get the parts for the bike. So just to be clear. I will most likely have to replace the float needles and seat? oil change aswell. During this process i would need to adjust the float level to prevent too much fuel into the carb correct? Mind you i have absolutely no experience in this department. Do you think this would be a job im able to complete? Thanks again
 

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You can just read up on carbs and take your time. When you adjust your floats tilt the carbs so that the floats would be siting on the bike. Then tilt them till they just stop. Should still be angled pretty good. Then take a 14 or 15mm nut and get the float flush with the flat side of the nut when the nut is on the body of the carb. Thats not the right way to do this but it will get you close. I have some pics in a carb build thread I did but there are better ones on here im sure. Youtube is your best friend right now.
Just take your time and be patient. I would get at least, float needles and seats with new O-rings, and float bowl gaskets. A rebuild kit per carb shouldn't be much more than $40. I usually just replace the parts that are messed up. In your case the needles and seats. $20 or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok that is exactly what I read up on how to do carb floaters should be the hardest part as far as I can see we shall see wat the shop says in way of parts cost
 

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Yeah shouldnt be too much money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well just finally got off the phone with the parts department and to replace the float needles and seats its a total of 275 bucks with discount. That unfortunately is gonna have to wait till probably after Christmas as school work and other bills got me strapped for cash.
 

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I agree 100% with Christi's assesment. Your cyinders are full of fuel and are "hydrolocked" now. I dont however agree that you need to go out and order new float valves. Its extremely unlikely that they are actually damaged. Its more likely that you had a set of circumstanced that caused them to stick open. Combine a sticky float valve needle with putting the choke on full and then with a cold bike keeping the throttle open at the same time, and you have a flood disaster. My guess is that you will find fuel in one cylinder only, or maybe two if the flood spilled over from one to the next one downhill (starting on the side stand).

First things first:
remove fuel tank
pull the spark plugs
disconnect the coils

Then turn the bike over. You will get a jet of fuel out the plug holes so be prepared for that, dont have your face in front of them. If you have an air compressor you can blast some air down the plug holes to further dry them out.

Then, change your oil. Its likely contaminated with fuel.
From pulling the plugs you should be able to tell which carb is the problem, or at least which pair. (Again, I'd be surprised if all 4 have a problem).

*read everything first, but the note at the end goes here*

At this point you really need to pull the carbs and at least take off the bowls. I suspect you are going to find some crap in the bowls. My guess is some lovely gelatin looking globs that are either preventing the float valves from returning to seated position or a float thats hung up. Using compresed air and carb cleaner clean everything in the bowls. Our carbs are really pretty simple and if you take your time and use youtube for some demos you should be able to clean a set of carbs with minimal experience.

Tips:
Use a propane torch on the little brass jets to burn off any blockages, finish with carb cleaner and compressed air.
DONT mess with the sync screws and dont split the carbs from the rack.
Pulling a carb rack out can be a pain, a warm day or a hair dryer to soften the rubber boots you need to get past will help.
Be picky on the flaot level, it matters. A clear plastic ruler with mm on it can be had from just about any place that sells school supplies. Find a video that explains how to set the float levels, its easy, but a little hard to explain in words. A video would make it obvious. Just about any video will work to, doesnt have to be model specific, most carbs have a VERY similar setup. Just compare yours to ones you find in a video.
Float needle valves have a rubber looking tip. That tip should be free of defects. If you see a ridge or groove or they are otherwise damaged you will have to replace them. I suggest looking at them with a magnifying glass. If they are good, as I suspect they are, you wont need to buy new ones.
Also inspect the brass seat they go into. Check for buildup that would prevent a good seat.
Bowl gaskets are reusable, no need to replace them unless you damage one.
9 times out of 10 I can resurrect carbs with $0 cost in parts. Just a good cleaning is generally all you need. And by clean, I mean surgically clean.




*NOTE* ALL THAT SAID, there is one alternative I might suggest is worth a try. I say with caveat that it may only get you running for now and likely the carbs will still need a good cleaning in the end. After changing your oil you could attempt to start the bike by putting back in the plugs, hooking up the coils and rigging an external source of fuel (a gasoline IV bottle, so to speak. I use a large clear syringe purchaced from a feed store and some clear tubing). As you pour fuel into the source, tap the carb bowls quickly with the end of a wooden hammer handle or something like that. (Focus on the one or two that you identified as flooding). Often times a dry needle will reseat itself from the vibration of the tapping once the carb starts to fill.

You will be able to tell if the carb is still flooding as at some point. Once the bowls fill, the carbs shouldnt take any more fuel (your external source stop draining). If the tapping the carbs works and the float valve closes, and your source of fuel remains stable at some point, try to start the bike as you normally would. If this testing method fails, you will just need to take the carbs off and identify the problem.

The hardest part ahead of you is just getting the carbs off to work on them. If you can manage that, you have the skills and tools required to do the job. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can't thank you guys enough for the speedy responses. Tomorrow is a complete bike day I purchased some cleaner and minor tools to do the job of cleaning carbs ill attempt a trial and error to see what works. Thanks again I will keep you all posted


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Sounds good. And youre welcome
 

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One more thing....

Check the floats for any just so small damage or hair cracks also, (you may need a magnifying glass for this too) if they fill with fuel, they will never be able to close the valve since they become too heavy to "float" up and close the valve, happened to me many years ago on an old Honda. Most people forget about this part :smile
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Ok so I got the bike apart and noticed fuel was in my air filter housing not good when I got to the carb there was tons of fuel around the opening of the left carb only that one no other carb had fuel. I was unable to get the carb off cause the information I was told about the carb removal wasn't correct on mine. Ill hopefully find a manual online somewhere. Also there was two hoses being held together by electrical tape the upper carb hoses both of them. Most likely would cause a issue. The spark plugs also are weird because each spark plug hose (dunno what they are called) has wires attached to them not allowing me to pull them off like usual. Other than that tomorrow is another day ill post pictures as well thanks


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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Update: As of yesterday I put the carbs back on the motorcycle attempted to start the bike. I charge the battery as well. On turning the bike over no mechanical reaction at all. It didn't want to even attempt to crank over. Unaware of new issues. That being said I checked the coils for spark and the spark plugs didn't even give a spark. I don't have a multimeter to test the ohms ATM that will come later. I'm starting to give up on fixing and replacing things on the motorcycle at this point. I can't financially afford the upkeep for consistent problems... Any ideas?


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Im confused. When you hit the start button absolutely nothing happens, no click no nothing? If thats the case you cant test your coils as they need to be triggered by the CDI during rotation.

You need to track your power circuit. Double check anything you had to unplug to get the carbs out, and check your main fuse as well. Do you get any lights on with the key on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yes there is a ticking but no mechanical attempt from the engine ie cranking over or anything. Fuel is flowing, not sure if the coils are giving charge to plugs but plugs are good had those checked. As for connecting everything it all looks good and is very one way with the carb connection. That being said I'm not sure if the throttle has to do with anything on the carb end to start the motorcycle. For some reason the throttle when connected it will open the carbs but will not snap back to neutral position. I don't know what I'm doing wrong there but I've looked at sites and I'm installing it correctly.. But no there is clicking from the motorcycle on pushing starter there IS NOT any mechanical motions from the engine on pressing the starter. Hope this helps clarify. I'd still like some other ideas thanks in advance
 
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