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What would be the best setting on the front forks for the "occasional" wheelie or two? I dont want to blow out my fork seals or damage anything.
 

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Smooth throttle operation to set the front end down gently would be the preferred way to come down from a wheelie.. I dont know if theres a fork setting that would be better than another... somewhere in the middle of the range i would guess. You sure wouldn't want them all the way soft... or completely hard. Just dont chop the throttle to come down and slam all the weight on the forks.. AND frame neck! There are no settings to help cracked or bent frames..

I love this thing too much to do deliberate wheelie's with.. I've got other bikes for that. Maybe the occasional lift under acceleration.. but popping it up just to wheelie could bite you in the azz.

See you on the road,

Jerry
 

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Wheelies?....Now that's the SPIRIT!:crazyloco

Yup, nice controlled descent is the key...but you'll probably have to do 100 wheelies to get the technique down...:crackup
 

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I lifted the front up about 2 ft on my test ride. It was stable but it I was suprised it came up that easy. I felt it was easy to keep it controlled coming down.

I'm no wheelie expert or squid but I do enjoy a handfull of throttle every now and then.
 

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Wheelies

I am not a killjoy by any means but do we really want to use a state of the art top level touring machine with a price tag of £11000 to pull wheelies. I think I would prefer to keep both wheels on the ground especially when most people who ride these bikes have a problem putting there feet firmly on the ground. I have never been very good at doing them in my early days of biking anyway so maybe I'm biased. Karl.
 

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I'm with you, Karl - but I have noticed that it's absurdly if not invariably common to get a riser with the throttle in first gear above 5-6thousand R's. I was talking with a ZX-14 rider yesterday, and he and I seemed to have developed a similar technique for asserting precise control at WOT in first - lean forward, grip with legs, keep arms and wrists somewhat relaxed. At WOT somewhere above 5k the front wheel will invariably lift off, but first you feel it lighten, then skip. I usually relax the throttle a bit when it skips, and that keeps enough weight to steer, but balance for steering becomes more important in a kind of dynamic way as the front end gets lighter.

If a person is leaning too far back with arms too straight, it will be much harder to control throttle input as precisely to keep the front end where you want it because of the need to hold on and the tension on your arms caused by acceleration, while at the same time, weight is further back. In my opinion that is pretty dangerous. Be careful of WOT, especially in first, as it might make for a very choppy, jerky, or even dangerous ride if not keeping arms and wrists loose enough to make adjustments on the throttle smoothly and freely.

Personally at any R's over about 7k, I've got better things to do than fixate on the clocks and I find it's better to keep my eyes outside the cockpit, my thoughts well ahead of the bike, and pay close attention to steering and balance.

Maybe someone out there with more experience could elaborate on this better than me, but that's how I do it right now. Why anyone would want to remove the flies on this beastie is totally beyond me, but maybe as I get more used to the power I'll feel differently...
 
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