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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These go for about 100 bux and is much better than any filter out there and it is reuseable forever. Here's the skinny:

Superior Filtration:
This should be the last oil filter you will ever buy! Made from laser cut, medical grade, 304 stainless steel micronic filter cloth, this filter provides 200% more filter area in many cases. Most good paper filters will pass particles in the 90 to 95 micron range, and some tested, as much as 300 microns. Sand is about 125 microns and a white blood cell approximately 25 microns. Our stainless filter catches items down to 35 microns "absolute", which is about 3 times better than most good paper or brass filters. The pleat seam is welded, able to withstand up to 600 degrees in our filter, not glued, like paper filters.

Cleanable and reusable:
Simply remove the filter, rinse in clean solvent and replace it, you're done. The filter can be cleaned with solvent, kerosene, aerosol carburetor cleaner, or any other degreasing agent, even common dish soap. You can even blow air through the filter from the inside out to remove any small particles or cleaning agent from the screen if you so desire.

Consistent flow under all conditions:
Stainless steel will stand up to the stress of heat, high pressure and physical handling much better than paper or brass. This filter maintains consistent flow under all conditions including cold start ups and or under extreme heat. A one inch square of this micron filter material will flow 1.9 gallons of 90 weight oil per minute at only 1 psi pump pressure (70 degrees F). Our typical filter size is 30 sq. in. which equals the flow of 57 gallons per minute. Standard paper filters do not flow well when the oil is cold, often causing the bypass valve to open allowing unfiltered oil to enter your engine, uhg!

Unaffected by Water, Heat and Pressure:
This filter is capable of withstanding extremely high pressure and flow rates. It is also unaffected by Water, Heat and Pressure, unlike standard paper filter material which swells in the presence of water, closing off filter pores and reducing flow.

Early Detection:
By allowing you to inspect the debris that is in the filter you can monitor your engines condition, avoiding minor and or catastrophic failures.
 

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I have one,like it alot. No having to worry about finding a filter for a oil change. My stock clutch(like many others)grenaded:banghead . I dropped the oil pan,cleaned out the big pieces and did a 7 filter/20+qt. flush,then fitted the Scotts
In getting the bike ready for El Mirage this year,I decided to drop the pan again and see if the mill was clean. Basically,the pan still had a a few flecks of aluminum in it as did the oil pickup screen. When I opened the Scotts,I found a significant amount of smaller aluminum fillings and the magnet had a pinch of ferrous metal fur on it. All in all the Scotts performed as I had hoped and was easy to clean. The only downside I noticed was the presence of a more than usual amount of clutch mud in the bottom of the pan. Inspection of the clutch revealed normal wear,so my theory is that the element in the Scotts can't filter out this material as its finer than the screen mesh pitch.
As to whether this material floating around the mills innards is detrimental is to be seen.
I have thought that these filters might me a blessing in an internal cooling system failure. When coolant hits the element in a paper filter,the papers swells,closing its pores and reducing oil flow sometimes to the point of starvation. This won't happen with this metal element. Sure,coolant contaminated oil will circulate through the mill,but thats better than running dry!
In all honesty,the Scotts will not filter as efficiently as a paper element,but it does offer reduced pumping losses(free HP),enviromental gains as yer not tossing a used filter in the rubbish and the ability to see to what degree your engine is consuming itself.
Until theres some Real World testing of these,do like myself,use at your own risk.
 

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what I have found out about this type filter is that they are hard to clean. I found a study done by the military and they decided not to use it because to get it really clean you need a sonic bath cleaner. that sounds a little expensive to me. the average person isn't going to keep a bike long enough to justify the cost of buying one of these when you have the option of getting other good quality filters anywhere from around $2 to $6 each.
 

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That was my thought....averaging $5 per filter, that's 20 oil changes. If you change once a year, the bike is going to be pretty well spent before you break even on the filter. Same goes even if you average three changes every two years. I dunno. Doesn't seem like that great a deal...


DW
 

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Basically,its a great filter for a racebike. You know,a vehicle that the mechanics need to know whats going on inside the mill. Easier to take one of these down each race than cut a paper element apart.
As far as a sonic cleaner,one that would work on one of these filter would cost in the realm of $40.00. The military wouldn't like having to use a sonic cleaner in the field. Cleaning mine took about half a can B12 Chemtool,a jewelers loupe,a toothbrush,a dental pick and about 1/2 an hour.
I bought mine because I wanted to be able to monitor any remnants of my blown clutch. After cutting seven regular filters apart,this was worth the C-note.
But I do have one reservation,the clutch material in the pan. A paper filter would have collected that.
The "gurus" I have told me not to be concerned as the material is soft and malleable and is unlikely to cause any damage. Myself,I really don't like the idea of that shit floating around the mill. Guess I'll be the guinea(sic) pig.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I saw this on another forum and thought it was interesting. I finally found someone that has one!!!!!! :mfclap I'm still using paper filters, as I spent my $$$$$ on other [email protected] before I got around to buying s Scott's. It sounds like a great idea......... guess I'll stick with the K&N until we hear some more reports on this!!!!!!!!!
 

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I use one in my 05crf250r dirtbike as I change the oil after every two rides. Dont have one for my zx9, as others have stated it is somewhat pricey even though i change my oil more than once a year. It was around $60 i believe for the one for my dirtbike.
 
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