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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I searched through the forum and couldn't find the exact info I was looking for. So forgive me if this turns out to be a repost. I have a question regarding the "proper" break-in of my '07 ZX6R. The manual clearly states 0-800km (0-500mi)->max 4000rpm. 800-1600km (500-1000mi)->6000rpm. I Googled the crap out of this and everything I found suggested I do the opposite...Drive it like ya stole it!! I don't agree with either one, there has to be some middle ground. How bout some advice from guys/gals with XP.
 

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I personally think that 4000 RPM is pretty low even for break in......on the ZX6 anyway. And the break in method of "Drive it hard" is claimed to make more horsepower but in the long run will do more damage to your engine. Basically dont get too caught up in break in....Just drive it under normal conditions not to slow but not racing. Engine break frequently and use various RPM ranges while driving and you will be all set.

Even though I followed the 1000 mile break in I almost think its overkill. I mean if your riding around at 6,000 RPM for an hour those rings have to be seated by then. Thats alot of rpms. Just a thought.
 

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what i've seemed to find and i know some will agree, the motor is "broke in" after about the first 20 miles. The first 20 miles will determine how well the rings seat to the cylinder walls. that's why most race motors are broke in on a dyno. they are revved up and heated up then turned off and cooled down, and then repeat the process, about three times of this and that's pretty much the initial break in. do an oil change to get the shavings right out and drive it like normal for the first 500 miles.
 

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There are definately two schools of thought about this one!!:headscratch

I think what everybody agrees on is that the manual is totally wrong!:banghead

4000 rpm is way too slow for a small capacity, high revving engine which doesn't develop much power down there! The engine is labouring the whole time and that is the last thing you want during break-in!!:angry

I personally also do not believe in the "Ride-the-crap-out-of-it" during break-in! The heat build-up initially (although you might not notice it on the temp. gauge),is definately more while everything is still a little stiff, and that is a no-no for the rings, they loose some of their tension.

That said, it should be ridden at sufficient power to produce enough combustion force behind the rings for proper seating. My dealer recommended initial (150-200km) 6000rpm varying it up to 8000-9000 and thereafter every 100km to increase by 1000rpm. This in my opinion is the best compromise between the two schools of thought!!

Whatever you use, enjoy your ride and keep it safe!!:crazyloco
 

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anyone have or heard of the long-term results of somebody who used the "ride it like you stole it" method compared to the long-term results of the "manual" method??
 

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anyone have or heard of the long-term results of somebody who used the "ride it like you stole it" method compared to the long-term results of the "manual" method??
There are many many threads just like this one on any given bike forum, the arguement is always a 50-50 split. There dosent seem to be any differance in the long term, for really, when you think about it, most parts wear over the "long term" so, the debate is always "would those parts have lasted longer", and that my friend is something that no one can predict, for the wear and tear of anything mechanical is not only in the break in period, but the whole use and maintenance of it's life.
 

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I agree with JJ. The long term is really the test. It's not just how you rode it during the break-in, but how you ran it during the life of the vehicle...such as did you let the oil warm up before you "pushed" it each ride, how often did you change your oil, etc.

If any of you have seen any controlled tests of multiple, similar bikes run differently during break-in, I'd like to see that data.

I'm guessing on the ZX-12r, however there were controlled tests, because, Kawasaki changed the break-in procedure several months after its 2000 introduction, reducing the RPM limit due to break-in issues. I even got a letter and a brand new, revised owners manual in the mail emphasizing the change.

On the other hand, based on my observations, most people who ride hard have traded in, sold (or maybe even destroyed) the bike before its life cycle is up, so who knows how the bike's life was affected.

If others want to run one hard on break-in...go for it. I prefer to follow the guidelines, but that's my personal opinion.

Snakebyte
 

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i try to stick to the ride it easy method. my dad (a factory kawi mechanic) always claimed that the cams need around 500 miles to brake in. about the same with the rings. i think there are a lot of details to take into consideration. the piston rings do more than just seat themselves. as the pistons go up and down, the rings are spinning around the pistons. unlike 2 stroke bikes that have little pins to prevent the rings from rotating, 4 stroke bikes need the rings to spin. i think this is an additional consideration on break in. also, the clutch needs to break in. hard use of the clutch early will cause it to get hot and will harden the surfaces of the plates causing it to lose grip and longevity. i've only ever had to break in one new engine. I tried to stick with the factory approved program, but when I got excited and cheated, I didn't let it bother me either. I guess I agree with Dup. Try to find a middle ground and everything will be fine.
T
 

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My dealer's head-mechanic said not to go much about 6000 revs the first 500 miles, and to vary the rpm a lot. He said you can rev it a little higher for quick spurts , but NOT to keep the revs up until the rings, etc. have sealed. - I Wouldn't recommend the "Rip on it right away approach" - and its also virtually impossible to keep the 6R under 4000 rpm. - Sooo ... I would say take the "Middle of the Road" approach"
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info. When you really think about it. Kawasaki engineers should know what they are talking about. I'm following the guildlines to break it in right. My last ZX6R had 50,000km, it was broken in properly and imo runs stronger than when it was new.
 
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