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I installed a muzzy fan on my 2011 ZX14. That bike needed every degree of cooling. As for my 2012 ZX14R. Piece of mind for my 2012 14R. I was able to get my 2011 to run a little cooler by using engine ice and the muzzy aluminum fan, thought I would do the same with my 2012 14R.

I have already noticed while idling my bike in my garage with absolutely no air flow, I could feel the cooling fans would flow more air than before. Plus, the cooling fans didn't stay on as long. The temp gauge dropped a little quicker than normal.

I spent $70 on the fan blades and $44 on two 1/2 gallons of engine ice coolant. So for about $115, it's a cheap upgrade.
HRCH
it's not an upgrade
An upgrade is when something is wrong.
If $115 gives you peace of mind, fine.
I'm $115 richer than you.:nana
 

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Yup, I did it for me. Everyone one has different heat tolerances. Almost every one who owns the first generation ZX14 will agree on one thing. The bike runs hot. The heat blasting on our legs sometimes is too much. (it was for me) That was the major concern I had with my 2011 ZX14 and that's why it's gone. The 2012 is a major improvement all around. I'm not trying to re engineer the bike, I just wanted it slightly better for "me". and it is. That's all.
 

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Quinton Phuckin Tarantino
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I think the biggest deal with keeping the coolant at or a little above thermostat opening temp is it keeps the oil cooler since the coolant runs through the oil cooler they are similar temps . The hotter the coolant temp ,the hotter the oil temp . When the oil temp gets higher it gets thinner and under normal riding conditions that is no big deal but if you ride it hard in higher temps this could cause big problems . Do what you will with this info , I'm not really taking sides here because most bikes won't be ridden that hard at high temps any way.
 

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Yup, I did it for me. Everyone one has different heat tolerances. Almost every one who owns the first generation ZX14 will agree on one thing. The bike runs hot. The heat blasting on our legs sometimes is too much. (it was for me) That was the major concern I had with my 2011 ZX14 and that's why it's gone. The 2012 is a major improvement all around. I'm not trying to re engineer the bike, I just wanted it slightly better for "me". and it is. That's all.
I'm not one of them to agree.
Mine runs normal like the rest of them.
it's those silly bars that let people think it runs hot.
And heat blasting on your legs isn't the motor problem, it's a fairing design problem.
Adding fans to the first gen 14 isn't going to cure the heat on the legs.
 

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Thin oil is not a problem though.
It actually needs to be thin, to flow fast enough to lubricate and carry heat away.
Think about machining.
What happens if you pour some cold, heavy oil on a drill bit in a press?
It just smokes and burns off. It's too thick and not moving.
It doesn't lubricate or carry heat away.
What does the coolant system for maching/drilling look like? (like a CNC machine).
It's thin, fast-moving lubricant.
Picture your crankshaft, spinning in the bearings, like a drill bit, spinning against metal stock.
You want thin, fast-moving lubricant in there. Thin enough to flow in/out of that tight space, lubricating and carrying heat away.
In order to get the engine oil that thin (target viscosity), it needs to get to operating temp.
These days, operating temps are about 212F, give or take a few.
People sometimes get this image in their head, that the engine is running too hot, therefore breaking the oil down and thinning it out prematurely.
When in reality, your engine oil NEEDS to get that hot before it's even doing it's job properly. The oil molecules actually never break down. The additives are what fail. That's why they can recycle oil.
And in reality, their engine is NOT running too hot either. The cooling system is just giving up it's heat (a sign that it's working perfectly) onto their legs and making THEM hot.
I don't own a 14, but I'll bet a donut, that the manual does not say:
"WARNING: This vehicle has an inadequate cooling system. Upon purchase, immediately upgrade the coolant and radiator fan, to avoid overheating."
 

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Thin oil is not a problem though.
It actually needs to be thin, to flow fast enough to lubricate and carry heat away.
Think about machining.
What happens if you pour some cold, heavy oil on a drill bit in a press?
It just smokes and burns off. It's too thick and not moving.
It doesn't lubricate or carry heat away.
What does the coolant system for maching/drilling look like? (like a CNC machine).
It's thin, fast-moving lubricant.
Picture your crankshaft, spinning in the bearings, like a drill bit, spinning against metal stock.
You want thin, fast-moving lubricant in there. Thin enough to flow in/out of that tight space, lubricating and carrying heat away.
In order to get the engine oil that thin (target viscosity), it needs to get to operating temp.
These days, operating temps are about 212F, give or take a few.
People sometimes get this image in their head, that the engine is running too hot, therefore breaking the oil down and thinning it out prematurely.
When in reality, your engine oil NEEDS to get that hot before it's even doing it's job properly. The oil molecules actually never break down. The additives are what fail. That's why they can recycle oil.
And in reality, their engine is NOT running too hot either. The cooling system is just giving up it's heat (a sign that it's working perfectly) onto their legs and making THEM hot.
I don't own a 14, but I'll bet a donut, that the manual does not say:
"WARNING: This vehicle has an inadequate cooling system. Upon purchase, immediately upgrade the coolant and radiator fan, to avoid overheating."
Your right. Overheating means the coolant is bubbling out of the radiator, these motorcycles absolutely do not heat up and boil over. I was a week in the Mojave Desert and it didn't heat up. I rode my ZX-11, round trip, from San Francisco to Southern Mexico, hot deserts in the US and Mexico for days and stop and go long stretches and it never boiled over.
 

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Quinton Phuckin Tarantino
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18,914 Posts
Thin oil is not a problem though.
It actually needs to be thin, to flow fast enough to lubricate and carry heat away.
Think about machining.
What happens if you pour some cold, heavy oil on a drill bit in a press?
It just smokes and burns off. It's too thick and not moving.
It doesn't lubricate or carry heat away.
What does the coolant system for maching/drilling look like? (like a CNC machine).
It's thin, fast-moving lubricant.
Picture your crankshaft, spinning in the bearings, like a drill bit, spinning against metal stock.
You want thin, fast-moving lubricant in there. Thin enough to flow in/out of that tight space, lubricating and carrying heat away.
In order to get the engine oil that thin (target viscosity), it needs to get to operating temp.
These days, operating temps are about 212F, give or take a few.
People sometimes get this image in their head, that the engine is running too hot, therefore breaking the oil down and thinning it out prematurely.
When in reality, your engine oil NEEDS to get that hot before it's even doing it's job properly. The oil molecules actually never break down. The additives are what fail. That's why they can recycle oil.
And in reality, their engine is NOT running too hot either. The cooling system is just giving up it's heat (a sign that it's working perfectly) onto their legs and making THEM hot.
I don't own a 14, but I'll bet a donut, that the manual does not say:
"WARNING: This vehicle has an inadequate cooling system. Upon purchase, immediately upgrade the coolant and radiator fan, to avoid overheating."
I agree with certain aspects of what your saying here but others you are off base . A flood cooling system on a cnc machine is totally different than squirting oil on a drill bit because it actually cools as it runs across the cutting edge so the cutter and metal never get hot . If you ran oil through the same system in the same manner the cutter wouldn't get hot either but you would also have 60 gallons of a potentially flamable substance running through the machine witch isn't really good plus the epa wouldn't really like you getting rid of all the waist oil after it was spent any way. The zx 14's cooling system is fine (on this matter we do agree) . But from your statements I can gather you don't agree that too thin of oil can hurt your engine but it can the viscosity breaks down with high temps . Just because antifreeze isn't boiling out of the bike doesn't mean the oil is not too thin to do its job especially if the oil is ready to change . The truth is when the engine is hot ( not just up to normal operating temps and not boiling over ) the oil can be too thin to hold its film strength at high rpm . Lots of breakdowns happen this way this is the whole reason that these bikes have oil coolers in the first place . If not we would all run 0 weight oil and throw the cooler on the ground to save weight and gain a little HP. Have you ever seen a gp bike up close? They have huge radiators and oil coolers that take up the whole front fairing opening just so thay don't have these kinds of problems. Most people don't run an engine this hard in the heat so its not a big deal but be sure of one thing it can happen.
 

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I just ordered the Muzzy fan blades for my 2012 ZX14R. My bike has two fans (stock) My bike doesn't run too hot, but since it somewhat worked with my 2011 ZX14, I figured it has to work a lot better for a bike which has two fans. I'm also going to convert to engine ice. I'm going to do the work all together. I remember the amount of air flow the muzzy fan produced compared to the stock plastic fan.
Old thread but I been thinking of putting duals on. I have my old one fro. My wreck zx9r. Wonder if it would work on my 14 and how much mods would it take. Did you out to OEM fans on or a after market? Like to have my 14 run cooler.
 

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3,675 Posts
why? high temp flashing? overheating? racing the bike?
motors are designed to run hotter and create the most hp
running too cool can have a negative impact on power
Well I will keep it the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I have noticed a lot of difference with my 2009 ZX14 after the install of the fan. My fans don't run nearly as long and to me in stop and go traffic, that makes a huge difference. Bike doesn't reach the top bar on the temp gauge anymore and it makes me feel safer. If these bikes had an actual temp gauge, it would be easier to see what temp the bike is running.
 
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