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I always clean them with ultrasonic cleaner followed by blasting passages with carb cleaner. Gasoline is not really going to clean carbs and passages. If it did all you would have to do is run it.
Check that you have strong spark at all four plugs. After trying to start it, remove one of the plugs and see if it is fouled and wet with fuel. Does it smell of gas when it doesn’t start? Could be the back firing is fuel building up and then igniting but getting drowned out.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
How do I check the strength of the spark? I did put in new spark plugs and gapped them to specification.
 

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What I meant is, make sure you have a fat blue spark on all four plugs. Ground them one at a time against the cylinder head to check. If they do not spark, you might have another issue (ie:grey wire...). Need to figure out if you have everything needed for combustion. Fuel mixture, compression and spark. Any of these missing and motor will not run. If you are sure that the carbs are providing mixture, assuming you have reasonable compression, that only leaves proper spark.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I tried starting the bike today and it will run consistently and smoothely with the choke at least 3/4ths engaged but will stall as soon as I shut the choke off. I am thinking the carbs need a second and better round of cleaning. What's this ultra sonic cleaner mentioned earlier? Also, any other tips on properly cleaning them? Such as what passages do I spray?
 

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If it runs fine on choke but stops when choke is off, maybe just the idle screw backed out too far. Did you unscrew it when cleaning the carbs?
You were posting that it wouldn’t start. Now it will but won’t run without choke? Did you do anything to correct the no start?
 

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Discussion Starter #27
It started only that one time. Now it won't start again. It does sound like it wants to catch on but just can't. I will check the spark and then probably remove the carbs again for a second cleaning. I did not touch the idle screw.
 

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Or,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

You cant get the stuff we used to that coined the phrase "boil out the carbs" so what I do now is , Get a crock pot add Dawn with water, using Berrymans or old school carb cleaner can have chemical reactions, especially with the plastic parts, although Dawn is on the low end of the harshness scale. Certainly less so than carb "dip" but still a good idea to keep an eye on it as it cooks. Dawn or what ever and cook them for a day or two.
Make sure you get all the small o rings out that are buried in the carb body, like the air mixture screws and take note where they went and get new ones. Get an electrical cord and use the single strands to do the small ports etc. Get a can or 2 of Carb Cleaner and shoot it into a shot glass, put the pilot and main jets and let them soak for a day. Put the tip on the carb cleaner can and start blasting out every port, then push the wire back in them and douche them out again. Rinse in hot water and blow them out 1 more time with a air compressor.
The Pilot Jet holes are small, like really small, Hold them up to a bright light, If you can see a dim glow in the center there clear, No visible light in the center they are plugged. Ive never been able to find a wire that will go through the center, So soak in carb cleaner and use air pressure to clear them out. Also I always screw the air / fuel mixture screws in all the way before I install the orings and count how many turns in until it bottoms out. With the orings in you will start feeling resistance and those screws and seats are very fragile. When you know how many turns in once the orings are installed you safely know how many more turns in is bottomed out.

Carbs are mechanical big time, there is not much to adjust, if all the ports are clear and clean they will work. when reassembling them use some oil on the o rings so nothing gets torn, Also the diaphragms will likely be all out of shape, so use some axle grease in the groves of the carb bodies to kinda glue the diaphragms in place so when you put the lids on they stay where they need to be.
Once you get the carbs all put back together with the bowls OFF but not on the bike, hook a hose to the fuel inlet that feeds all the carbs. flip the 4 carbs assembled upside down and blow air into the line.
You shouldn't be able to blow air through. Keep feeding air into the line and 1 carb at a time manually open each fuel valve and air should start coming thru, then close and no air flow. Do that for each carb and make adjustments to get all 4 working. Also when the carbs are upside down make sure the floats are all level.
Its a lot easier to get all this working off the bike.|

you can do it, piece of cake Bro !!!!
 

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For the time and money, I just bought an ultrasonic cleaner. Why get a crock pot and some chemical cocktail to clean carbs?
The right tool for the job. Otherwise just use spray cans of carb cleaner and compressed air.
 

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For the time and money, I just bought an ultrasonic cleaner. Why get a crock pot and some chemical cocktail to clean carbs?
The right tool for the job. Otherwise just use spray cans of carb cleaner and compressed air.
Yes your right. There was a lot more good info other then the ultrasonic VS crock pot for the OP.
I threw that up there because the bike wont run. TBH I dont even use a crockpot.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I purchased two cans of carb cleaner today and will try this as my last ditch effort. Thus far I removed the float bowls from two carbs and am soaking the main jets and their holders plus the pilot jets. I am planning on removing the pilot screws and soaking them too. Is it really necessary to remove the diaphram covers? I know I will have to drill out many of the cover screws and don't want to unless I absolutely have to. Any other advice would be great because I really don't know what the fuck I am doing.

BTW, I tested for spark at all four cylinders today before removing the carb assembly and they all looked good. I removed one spark plug and it was quite dry and a had a layer of black soot on it.
 

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I purchased two cans of carb cleaner today and will try this as my last ditch effort. Thus far I removed the float bowls from two carbs and am soaking the main jets and their holders plus the pilot jets. I am planning on removing the pilot screws and soaking them too. Is it really necessary to remove the diaphram covers? I know I will have to drill out many of the cover screws and don't want to unless I absolutely have to. Any other advice would be great because I really don't know what the fuck I am doing.

BTW, I tested for spark at all four cylinders today before removing the carb assembly and they all looked good. I removed one spark plug and it was quite dry and a had a layer of black soot on it.
Small vice grips can sometimes remove screws . If you don't spray passages in carbs and confirm clear or preferably soak carb bodies completely your wasting your time .
 

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Also, anyone working on Japanese bikes should invest in proper JIS screwdrivers instead of Phillips which will round out every head. Phillips are designed to ramp out under torque and therefore stripping anything remotely tight.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Small vice grips can sometimes remove screws . If you don't spray passages in carbs and confirm clear or preferably soak carb bodies completely your wasting your time .

Can you give me a list of which passages need to be sprayed out?
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I finished cleaning the main and pilot jets. Most of the tiny holes were indeed still clogged. Sunlight did shine through them when I got done. The carb cleaner spray and compressed air worked well. I also sprayed out the passages for the mains and pilots. Upon removing/reinstalling one mixture screw I of course managed to somehow push the rubber O-ring into the tiny hole. The O-ring ended up being in a few pieces and pressed into the tiny hole for the needle. I got lucky and was able to blow them out with compressed air, or at least I hope. No O-ring debris can be seen looking into the recess and the tiny hole for the needle looks clean and air blows through. So now I wait for the replacement O-ring to arrive.

I also checked the float heights today and they were all 0.5625 inch which is within the Clymer specs of 0.43-0.59 in. Now a question about fuel level based upon this in the manual:

The correct fuel level must be maintained in each carburetor float bowl to obtain optimum performance. Carburetor calibration throughout the entire engine speed range depends largely on the correct fuel level. The actual fuel level, is a much more precise adjustment than the simple float height adjustment performed during carburetor assembly. The fuel level can actually vary between carburetors even though the float heights are all the same. Fuel level gauge (part No. 57001-1017) is required for this procedure. The fuel level gauge is available from Kawasaki dealerships
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Do I need to purchase this or what? How do you check the fuel level using this gauge?
 

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That fuel level gauge is simply a graduated straw (pic below). You want the fuel level in all 4 bowls to be the same and most will simply set the float heights all the same. Fuel level takes into account that each float may be slightly different.
Since most guys just do float height, it will get you close enough. To get them set exactly, you need fuel level. I would just get the float heights into spec and try it out.
When you hold the pilot jet to the light you should see 3 tiny holes on all sides. When you hold the emulsion tube up to the light you will see 3 holes on two opposite sides and 5 holes on the other two sides.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Ok, thanks Ninjanut. Now that I am waiting for the O-ring I have time do to something with the diaphragm ends of the carbs. Do I simply remove the needle and blow the holes out with car cleaner and compressed air?
 

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You should already have the diaphragms and needles out to clean passages through. You shouldn’t be partially disassembling them, cleaning half then clean the other half.
Be organized and meticulous. Disassemble 1 carb at a time, place pieces in a container then move to the next one. Once everything has been removed, then start cleaning passages.
 
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