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Discussion Starter #1
I need to remove the carburetor assembly for cleaning. I removed the choke cable per Clymer manual instructions and loosened the throttle pull/push cables. I also loosened all four clamp screws to the point of the clamps freewheeling. When I try to lift up the assembly it won't budge. The whole bike moves back instead. What's going on here? Any tricks before I just put the whole thing back together and tow it to a mechanic?
 

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Just keep wiggling them and rock them back and forth. They can be a bitch to come out if they have never been removed.
 

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Once the clamps are loose and cables are off, they will come off. Don’t be overly aggressive and damage the rubber intake boots though.
 

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Pull straight up on the carb bowls. Not 90 degrees to the carbs, 90 degrees from the ground. Then pull straight back on the top of the carbs. As mentioned, don't go crazy. One hand on the front and back of the carbs. Pull one side at a time and rock them. They are a bitch in colder weather, and who knows when it was done last.

If you think this is hard, wait until you try to put them back on in the cold.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pull straight up on the carb bowls. Not 90 degrees to the carbs, 90 degrees from the ground. Then pull straight back on the top of the carbs. As mentioned, don't go crazy. One hand on the front and back of the carbs.
I pumped several shots of engine fogging oil into the seams between the carbs and rubber boots, waited 15 minutes for it to work around the diameters, did this, and they popped right off.

Now I need to unscrew the float bowls and black plastic covers that are on top of the carbs. Somebody told me these are JIS screws and just want to confirm having already stripped out the screw holding the choke bracket onto the assembly. If I need to get a JIS screwdriver I'll do so instead of going through the nightmare of drilling stripped screws out with an extractor.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I found that taking a drill with a screwdriver bit works perfectly in removing the float bowl screws. Managed to strip only one by hand until figuring this out. Now I have two questions about cleaning:

A) The main jet on one carb thus far was coated in varnish that I cleaned off after soaking it in gasoline and noticed it has many tiny holes throughout the shaft. I picked them with a paperclip needle end. Is this enough or should I look for a smaller diameter needle?

B) Can somebody give me run-down of what the pilot screw does? According to the Clymer manual, on US models it is supposed to be plugged and hence non-adjustable. On my bike there are no plugs and I noticed the outer two are more or less perpendicular to the float bowls while the inner two carbs have them roughly parallel. Are their settings dependent on each carb's tuning or are they supposed to be in the same position throughout all four carburetors? Pic attached so you can see what I am referring to.
 

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A. The main jets are screwed into the emulsion tube which has tiny holes down its length. Main jet only has one hole down the middle. Careful picking at them with any metal object which is harder than brass as you may distort, scratch or damage the orafice. At that point you will have troubles getting them to run perfect.
B. The pilot screw will richen the mixture (counterclockwise) or lean the mixture (clockwise). Screw them in and count number of turns in 1/4 increments until GENTLY seated. That is what they are set at. Usually they are all set the same. Make sure when you remove them that you extract the washer, spring and o-ring that is in there as well.
They should all point up perpendicular to the bottom of the carb.
 

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Japanese standard screwdrivers is indeed the key!
Also when you set the pilot screws remember to bottom them first.
Gently.
If they break it will cost you.


Skickat från min moto g(7) via Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Regarding the pilot screws I found that carbs 1 and 2 were three full revolutions out from gently seated. Number 3 was 2 3/4 turns out and number 4 was just over three full turns out. According to the Clymer manual:

Initial pilot air screw setting for 1993-1995 ZX7 models
Austrian, German - 1 3/4 turns out
California, US, Swiss - Fixed, not adjustable
All others - 2 1/4 turns out


Do I meet in the middle and go two turns out? By the way, judging by the spark plugs the bike was running rather rich.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Any ideas on the diaphragm screws? Could I simply use M4 screws even though the top part closer to the head is wider than the thread?
 

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Have you checked Kawasaki. They are shouldered and very specific. Using a regular bolt could lead to broken caps.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I got lucky and found them on ebay. They are 4x4.4mm shoulder bolts incase anyone else needs them. Since I am waiting for them to arrive I figure it is a good time to ask about this. When I took the air box off I found this pipe on the carb assembly just sitting there uncapped. Second pic is what was on the air box. Any idea what is going on here? I can't imagine the airbox should be drawing in unfiltered air like this. I looked on a Kawasaki parts diagram and could not make sense of it. The bike has the air injection (Clean Air) system but isn't a California model so it doesn't have the fuel vapor canister.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I cleaned out the float bowls, main jets, and pilot jets from the varnish and then put the carb assembly back on and the bike still won't run. At best it will start for a second or two then die. Does not matter if I try starting it with the choke or no choke but throttle open at all. Any other ideas because I am out of them and ready to just put the tank and fairings back on and probably tow it to a mechanic in the spring. Fuel lines, fuel filter, and spark plugs are all new.
 

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Starting issues will be the pilot jet circuit, mixture (pilot) screws and fuel level.
Is the fuel pump filling the bowls up to the correct level? When you cleaned the pilot jets, were they perfectly clear? When you reassembled the pilot screws, did you have the spring/washer/o-ring in correctly?
Did you blast out all the internal passages with carb cleaner and compressed air? If everything is not totally clean and clear, you will have issues. Ideally, I always ultrasonically clean carbs. You would be shocked to see what comes out of visibly clean carbs.
Also, how is the battery? Valve lash within specs?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Is the fuel pump filling the bowls up to the correct level?
All I know is that the bowls are filling up with fuel per cracking each drain plug.

When you cleaned the pilot jets, were they perfectly clear? When you reassembled the pilot screws, did you have the spring/washer/o-ring in correctly?
I got them as clean as I possibly could. The Cylmer manual said that carb cleaner is not recommended and so I used gasoline to clean them. I was very cautious when reassembling everything. I posted here about how the pilot screws were all three turns or more out and I set them all at 2.

Also, how is the battery? Valve lash within specs?
Battery is brand new and charged up to 13v. Did not check valve lash as I don't even know how. I should mention that the bike will backfire once in a while trying to start it. One loud popping noise like a gun going off.
 
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