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that video shows me the sseat sucks. her skinny arse was slidding forward and she tried scooting back and just lsid forward again. Corbin will be selling a lot of seats .
Why cant the oem get a seat right?
 

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the exhaust can doesn't look as HUGE from the rear in that video, looks flat on the inside,


still, the aftermarket will go wild.
 

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One man's lounge chair is another man's cockpit. Personally I like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
that video shows me the sseat sucks. her skinny arse was slidding forward and she tried scooting back and just lsid forward again. Corbin will be selling a lot of seats .
Why cant the oem get a seat right?
know what yer mean,can't see many skinny chicks buying one though i think it's more a bike for fat lads.
 

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Actually, the seat contour looks strikingly simular to that of a BMW R1200RT seat. Hmmmm
 

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She is sliding forward because she is trying to sit on the steeply sloped section at the rear of the seat. There is a lot of room in front of her where the seat is either flat or possibly even sloped up a little toward the front. It shouldn't be a problem except for exceptionally large people.

There are two schools of thought on seat comfort. One school of thought is that the seat should be heavily sculpted so as to distribute your weight over as much of your butt and inner thighs as possible. The other school of thought, which has fallen out of favor these days, is that the seat should be nearly flat along its length, so that you can slide back and forth, but well-padded and well-rounded at the side edges. The sculpted approach certainly makes sense for people who do mostly two-up riding, since then you can't slide back and forth anyway. But, since I ride almost exclusively solo, I prefer a seat that will permit me to slide backwards and stretch my arms and legs, and shift my weight to a different part of my butt.

The original Concours originally had a flat, well-padded, well-rounded seat, which seemed to me to be an excellent seat. But after owners started replacing it with Corbin seats, Kawasaki eventually changed the stock seat to a seat more like a Corbin seat.

While there are many people who swear by Corbin seats, there are also many people who curse them. There are lots of custom seat makers around, and the people that I know who seem to be happiest with their custom seats, are people who went to a smaller custom seat builder, who had the time to give them plenty of personal attention.

One of the best seats that I have ever ridden, believe it or not, is the seat on my CBR1100XX. Aside from being shaped very well, the fabric cover is practically as stretchy as latex. That makes a big difference for me, because I have a skinny arse and those two bony protuberances just sort of stick right out of my arse. A big part of the reason why the seat on the XX works so well is that like with many similar bikes, the combined effect of a leaned-forward riding position and a wide seat is that much of your weight rests on your upper thighs. The trade-off, of course, is that much of your weight is also resting on your arms.

Twenty-plus years ago, I rode a 1983 V-65 Magna. The handlebars were multi-adjustable for that particular model year. They changed it the following year to a conventional bent tube, but on mine, in addition to the ability to rotate the whole thing where it clamped to the top of the fork clamp, you could also change the downward angle of the grips, via a slip joint of sorts along the long straight section of the bars. I had it set fairly low, which was comfortable when I sat in the normal position up close to the tank, but because it was set low, I could scoot back on the seat and sit for a while on the short step-up part of the seat, and lean forward. It was very relaxing to do that for a few minutes every fifteen minutes or so. With that in mind, if there is anything about the C-14's seat that does not look appealing to me, is the excessive sculpting and the pronounced step. Of course, there is no way to know how stretchy the covering will be. But if I find myself contemplating a custom seat, it will likely be to get rid of most of the sculpting, especially the pronounced step, and possibly replace the cover with a sretchy rubberized fabric like the cover used on the XX.
 
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