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Discussion Starter #1
This happened a few times where cruising at highway speeds, 60-70 mph, it seems the front brakes will start to drag, slowly slowing the bike, which causes me to pull over to the side of the road. What leads me to think its the front brakes, is that laying off the throttle, the bike will dive a little forward; more than when you normally lay off the throttle would, and it will still slow after I open the throttle a little more. A couple times it has locked up once I have stopped and I need to push the brake lever fully forward to get it to unlock. When it happens though, I have never used the front brakes previously and would have been cruising for some time. Afterwards it doesn't do it again and the front brakes work just fine. Would this be a caliper issue or would it be in the master cylinder??? This is the first time working on a bike so Im looking for some guidance. It's a 2005 ZX6R 636 and the previous owner has steel braided brake lines installed in the front if that helps any. Any suggestion will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!!
 

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This is my idea
I doubt it's the caliper since it will free up.
I'm guessing there's aftermarket levers and something isn't adjusted right.
If you can push the lever forward and free up the brakes, then there's something binding in the lever or the pin in the master cylinder isn't in the lever correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Im pretty sure its an aftermarket peice. This is the master cylinder that I have on the bike:


And this the adjusting knob that's on the lever.
 

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If the caliper bores have any corrosion, the pistons will not return freely and the resultant brake drag will cause the brake fluid to overheat, expand and lock the brakes. If it turns out not to be a lever issue, look there next. Judging by the corrosion evident on some of the fasteners in the pics, your machine has spent some time either in salt air by the ocean or generally out in the elements. Either is a prescription for brake caliper corrosion.
 

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If the caliper bores have any corrosion, the pistons will not return freely and the resultant brake drag will cause the brake fluid to overheat, expand and lock the brakes. If it turns out not to be a lever issue, look there next. Judging by the corrosion evident on some of the fasteners in the pics, your machine has spent some time either in salt air by the ocean or generally out in the elements. Either is a prescription for brake caliper corrosion.
He lives in Hawaii, his bike basically swims in salt.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So a caliper rebuild wouldn't really remedy the issue then, if indeed there is corrosion within the caliper??? I would more likely have to get new calipers or would a shop be able to service them???
 

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A rebuild would work as long as you remove all corrosion from the pistons and caliper bores. There's no return spring or anything to retract the pads, so they will "kiss" the rotor even when no pressure is being applied. But if they can't return smoothly after pressure is let off, the dragging and the heat becomes a vicious circle that leads to lockup.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That does make sense. Ill take it apart and see what its like n maybe have a shop service them for me. Don't want it happening again. Lol. Thanks a whole bunch!!! :)
 

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Yeah, why would you take it all apart yourself, then pay someone else to do it once you get that far?

All they are gonna do is sand any corrosion out, rebuild the caliper, and give it back for 400 dollars.

Or, they will tell you the calipers are junk, give you new ones, and charge you 400 dollars.
 

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Yeah, why would you take it all apart yourself, then pay someone else to do it once you get that far?

All they are gonna do is sand any corrosion out, rebuild the caliper, and give it back for 400 dollars.

Or, they will tell you the calipers are junk, give you new ones, and charge you 400 dollars.
+1

They aren't hard to rebuild and the kits are cheap. Just make sure you bleed them thoroughly when you're done.
 

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OR you can pay ME $400 and I'll pull that rusty pin out of your brake lever and clean and lube it up and fix your problem.
But if it makes more sense to rebuild your motor and spend $400 on something that might not fix your problem.......start there.
And i have some ocean front property in AZ. Since wasting time and money seems to make more sense here.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
pvc: Ok, so how much grit sandpaper would be suitable to get rid of the corrosion and would you happen to have a part number for the rebuild kit??? I've tried searching for it but can't seem to find it.
 

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There probably isn't a "kit" per se, you'll need to purchase the individual seals and dust covers from an OEM parts supplier. When you get them apart, the grit you start with would depend on the extent of the corrosion, but you want to go with finer and finer grits until you get to about 1000 to polish out any scratches from the heavier grits.
 

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I did some checking and kits are still hard to find for your model. But, go on ebay and contact this guy, he may have one that fits your bike:
http://stores.ebay.com/Powerhouse-A...7952017&_sid=1008591237&_trksid=p4634.c0.m322


Otherwise, you can buy the individual seals:
43049-0003 x 4 (Packing Seal)
43049-1107 x 4 (Wiper Seal)
43048-0004 Piston if you need them.

Take them apart and look at the corrosion level to judge what grit you need, but I wouldn't go under 600. Make sure you go all the way around so you don't end up with a flat spot. Polish it up with some 1500 or even 2000 grit.

BTW... Easiest way to get the piston out is to remove the bleeder and then blow some compressed air into the hole where the bleeder was.

MAKE SURE your fingers are out of the way of the piston!!! I rushed my second caliper and didn't move my finger all the way out and almost broke my finger.

Get yourself some speed bleeders or go to your local auto parts store and get a one man brake bleed kit. It will be worth the money unless you have someone to help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks guys for all your help. The problem turned out to be with the master cylinder and a quick bleed resolved the issue. The front brake doesn't stick anymore and works perfect. I just kinda jumped to the worst conclusion instead of taking a look at the simple things first, which I tend to do. Lol. Thanks again for the help and information. :)
 
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