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Its done by grinding away the paint, down to the bare metal and then weld on a stud, then using a slide hammer you pull the dent... Then grind off the stud and repaint the tank.

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Its done by grinding away the paint, down to the bare metal and then weld on a stud, then using a slide hammer you pull the dent... Then grind off the stud and repaint the tank.

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Uhhh...he said ALUMINUM tank.

The answer is.......


Suction cups. You need a cup slightly larger than the dent and a pump to pull a vacuum on it.
 

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Tanks are double walled. So pdr is out of the queston. And suction cups will not work. Slide hammer and welded stud however will . I had it done on two of my tanks ., alluminum is not an issue

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But your method of suction cups could work if their wide enough

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
But he said small dents so why not just fill them in with body filler?
He'll have to use some form of filler or spot putty either way.
I guess we need to know what he considers small.
Ill see about some pics straight away. Pics are now on my page. the dent on top is the one im worried about most , then painting will have to be farmed out for sure.
 

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I guess when I read "aluminum tank", I envisioned the single-wall, hand-hammered alloy tanks you used to see on old cafe racers. I'm trying to imagine the advantage of double-wall aluminum over single-wall steel.
 

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Idk but its dumb... And if done properly man you won't need to use filler.. Problem with bondo is it cracks easy

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This i have to see to pull out a dent with welding and a slidehammer and not need anything to finish it off.
The only time I've seen no body work is the guys who have the paintless dent remover when they fish the rods in to remove a door ding. Even then it's questionable if they might crack the paint.
Not sure why it would crack on something solid like a gas tank. use the fiberglass reinforced filler. but a fairing, yes it would crack.
 

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I had $5000 worth of hail dents removed from my truck and you can't see anything. Those guys are amazing. The original estimate was half that, and when the body shop inspected it closely, they called me to come look before they started popping them out. My black truck was covered with pink Pepto-Bismol polka dots demarking all the dings. They are all gone now. Paint is still original.
 

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The M1/M2 tanks are aluminum and they're single wall (sorry Drew). I had to cut mine apart to fix damage on it. I'll post some pictures later. The compound curves of the tank give the aluminum more strength than you'd expect it to have. Generally any dent with a crease in it will noy simply pop out with pressure on the backside. the best way to get the dents out are as I did mine. Cut the bottom off, hammer and dolly the dents out and then weld the tank back together. If the dents are minor, shallow and no creasing then dry ice might possibly pull the dents. None of this is recommended for the weekend hobbyist. The aluminum is soft and can be really screwed up by a novice with metalworking tools in their hands.
 

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If you have a freezer large enough, fill the tank with water and put it in the freezer, as the water expands it will push the dents out but keep an eye on it. its an old school trick used on dirt bikes to pop out dents.
 

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Here's the after dent fixing before welding pictures









 

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I stripped the paint from the damaged areas to see what I had. I tried to save all the paint lines so my painter had reference points for the repaint. He'll strip it after he gets all the info he needs for laying out the stock paint scheme. The top front of the tank was caved in from something. I cut this apart and used a hammer & dolly to work out all the dents. There was also a dent where 3 bodylines meet, right at the point. I used several different hammers and dollies to get this done. Patience is a virtue with this kind of work. Here's the post welding pics:







 

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mike , no offense taken, however it would seem to me that if your paying someone to do it welding on a stud and grinding it off to repaint like i had on the 90 would have been easier. and cheaper ....

some damn good work though..
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the cutting method might be the best for me Im trying to preserve the graphics at all costs, im capable of dealing with the dents and a friend is a welder. The top area of the dent should come out(no crease) and the bottom area is off the graphics.
 

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it would seem to me that if your paying someone to do it welding on a stud and grinding it off to repaint like i had on the 90 would have been easier. and cheaper ....
Aluminum studs aren't as strong as steel studs. I don't know that you'd be able to pull the dents without snapping the stud.

some damn good work though..
Thanks
 

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It would seem to me that if your paying someone to do it welding on a stud and grinding it off to repaint like i had on the 90 would have been easier and cheaper....
I , fortunately, do not pay for my welding. My brother is an aircraft welder/ welding instructor. I'm on the friends & family plan with him.:evil
 
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