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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all. Just want a few opinions plz. Recently I bought a zx14. Now MIRACULOUSLY my wife would like to get a sport bike. Yeah can you believe? Not much convincing to do on my part! So as a driver, she drives very well. Not indecisive, she can be agressive but also fairly defensive too. Now that is a car we are talking about. We stopped by the bike shops and they are saying a cbr25, ninja 250, etc etc. First, if she gets a bike and gets hooked she and I both know that 250 wont be around for very long. Also I think a 250 is a bit on the weak side for her. If we are ripping down the highway and she finds out how slowly a 250 takes to pass someone she will be trading that in the next day. Now personally I have a philosophy of just because the power is there doesn't mean you have to use it and drive like a dipsh--. So my question would be, do you think a 600 size is too much for her? She reaaly like the gsxr600 when she sat on it. Height wise, she isnt that tall, like maybe 5'3". But strenght wise she is a very strong woman. She puts lots of guys to to shame at the gym. Not too many women can bench 130-140! BUT i dont want to use my philosophy and have her hurt herself because of me. So taking into account what type of driver she is, the size of woman she is, do you think a 600 would be too much? Thx all, as usual i appreciate your thoughts.
 

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With about 30 years of experience I tell you that a 250 is plenty powerful for a beginner with no riding experience, it is not about the power but how to really learn to ride and a smaller lighter bike is perfect for that purpose, she will lay it down, no question, but the smaller bikes are easier and cheaper to fix then the bigger ones.
And you need to learn to slow down so she can keep up with you on the smaller bike or make out checkpoints along the route you plan on going and you go ahead if needed and wait sometimes till she catches up with you.
But you could also go with an older 500 or 600 with low power. As I said it is not about how fast you can go someplace but to learn to ride and handle the bike first, to gain confidence and trust in your own abilities with the machine, the speed will increase automatically over time.
People starting out on bigger bikes without any experience are only doing that to show off or trying to "keep up with the Jones" like they say. It is only a recipe for disaster in the making.
Like I said in the beginning a 250 will serve well to begin with and she will have more fun learning that way. She will know when she outgrows it, then you can get something bigger and sell the little bike to another beginner.
By experience I would recommend a year on a small bike at least to learn and practice the basic skills and then upgrading when no more progress can be made.

Just my 2 cents
 

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I disagree. I started out with my 10R, learned to ride on it. I didn't get it to show off and didn't have anyone to ride with to keep up with, I got it because I wanted a bike and I couldn't pass up the price. It was a purchase of convenience. I never had an issue with the power. I was well aware that it was far beyond my abilities, and was more than a little scared of it, which is a lot of the reason why it didn't give me trouble. Having ridden dozens of bikes since then of all years and sizes, I'm convinced that it was the right choice. Thanks to the low end torque, learning to take off was super easy. I think I stalled it twice in the first summer of riding, which was around ten thousand miles. Smaller bikes are more difficult to synchronize clutch/throttle balance. On a literbike you don't worry about throttle, just ease out the clutch and it does the rest.

Regardless, I never encourage any adult to start with a 250. I see it as a complete waste of money. IMO, a 600 is a perfect starter bike. If you're worried about her dropping it and stuff, an older carb'd one will come a lot cheaper and you won't care as much, but the flip side is that the old ones are WAY heavier than the newer, faster, fuel injected ones. I say get her an older ZX6R (but new enough to be FI, so it's still light and easy to toss around, start, etc) like an 03-04 636 or other comparable 600 class bike. If you're worried about her dropping it, put a crash cage on it for awhile like training wheels. It sounds like she's a level headed, alert and responsible person, start her as close to where she's going to end up as possible- that's my vote.
 

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If she or you are worried about power, start on a 500. Pick em up nice and cheap, enough power to move you, can pick em up for $1000 or less. I nearly started on a zx7r and I'm glad I didn't. It was a nice light bike to learn on with not too much power to get me into accidental trouble.

I was able to unload for the same amount I paid for it. Then I got my 7. Very glad I waited until I "knew what I was doing" to ride that. I enjoyed it that much more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes for sure JBear about the course. I appreciate your opinions. The size of bike to start with seems to have as many opinions as how to break the bike in!lol. My zx14 is my first sport bike and it just feels right. Stable to the point of keeping it upright and turn at the slowest speeds yetheavy enough that 30 knot gusts dont bother it that much. But like I said i look at things differently. It can get very windy where we are and I know what it is like to drive smaller bikes in that. The thing is she doesn't want a cruiser. Too bad because a 900 vulcan or a shadow 1100 would have been nice. Heck my mom is 5 foot nothing and she handles the vstar 1100 no problem. I just dont want to push her into something she doesn't like. Oh and a bit off topic. To you americans......screw you! You guys kill us on prices. My 2012 zx14 OTD price was 16,600 and I hear guys of paying 14300 down there. Lucky buggers. I think the cbr600rr i was looking at has a msrp tag of 13400. Thanks guys!
 

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What's the exchange rate right now for CDN/USD? Last I checked it was pretty damn close.
 

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So my question would be, do you think a 600 size is too much for her?
No.
Now that I've had a chance to actually own a 600, it can be the most tame bike I've ever ridden. I always wondered why guys wouldn't recommend a 600 for a first bike because they were so fast. Fast, yes, but the bike doesn't even start to wake up until after 10k rpm and i don't see a beginner even getting close to that.
I think the 600 is great for a beginner. It's light, nimble and EZ to ride. Once they learn the bike, they can always get into the rpm's later and have an entirely different riding experience.
edit,
so your windy post. I was impressed with how stable the 6 was compared to my 14 at hwy speeds and passing semis. I would definately take it again on the hwy.
 

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With about 30 years of experience I tell you that a 250 is plenty powerful for a beginner with no riding experience, it is not about the power but how to really learn to ride and a smaller lighter bike is perfect for that purpose, she will lay it down, no question, but the smaller bikes are easier and cheaper to fix then the bigger ones.
And you need to learn to slow down so she can keep up with you on the smaller bike or make out checkpoints along the route you plan on going and you go ahead if needed and wait sometimes till she catches up with you.
But you could also go with an older 500 or 600 with low power. As I said it is not about how fast you can go someplace but to learn to ride and handle the bike first, to gain confidence and trust in your own abilities with the machine, the speed will increase automatically over time.
People starting out on bigger bikes without any experience are only doing that to show off or trying to "keep up with the Jones" like they say. It is only a recipe for disaster in the making.
Like I said in the beginning a 250 will serve well to begin with and she will have more fun learning that way. She will know when she outgrows it, then you can get something bigger and sell the little bike to another beginner.
By experience I would recommend a year on a small bike at least to learn and practice the basic skills and then upgrading when no more progress can be made.

Just my 2 cents
if she's smart/careful/takes her time learning she probably wont lay it down, i dont like when people say that your GOING to lay your first bike down.im 18 now and i had an '08 250r for 1 1/2 years and just moved up to a 650r, i have never come close to laying either of my bikes down, and no i am not a cruiser, i have scrubbed my way through many twisties and opened my bike up every now and then. its about choosing when and where to do so... yes a 250r is a perfect beginner bike for someone with no experience imo. somewhat harder to get yourself into trouble and much easier to learn on, and looking back, yes i could have learned on a 650r or a 600 but it would have taken much longer to get over intimidations and learn to relax and just ride, not to mention the excesive power that is not needed when learning. the 250r is smaller and has a MUCH lighter feel to it, it is much easier to ride, not to mention all that shifting will give much needed practice to help her become comfortable with shift/downshifting/when/how/etc... and when she moves up to a bigger bike, if she does, these skill will most deffinatley help.

also i'd buy a used 250r as she probably wont have it for more than 6 months, so there is no sense in wasting money and buying new.

just my opinions, hope it helps.
 

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No.
Now that I've had a chance to actually own a 600, it can be the most tame bike I've ever ridden. I always wondered why guys wouldn't recommend a 600 for a first bike because they were so fast. Fast, yes, but the bike doesn't even start to wake up until after 10k rpm and i don't see a beginner even getting close to that.
I think the 600 is great for a beginner. It's light, nimble and EZ to ride. Once they learn the bike, they can always get into the rpm's later and have an entirely different riding experience.
edit,
so your windy post. I was impressed with how stable the 6 was compared to my 14 at hwy speeds and passing semis. I would definately take it again on the hwy.
I kinda disagree. I have an 03 636 and its my first bike. And IMO it has plenty of power throughout the rpm range... Especially after your past 3-5k. Plenty for a beginner. But this is the fastest bike I've ridden so I could be biased.

As far as the OP's question. I say find a friend that has a 600 and see if they'll let her try it. Just maybe around a large parking lot or something. See how she feels. But def MSF and buy her lots of gear. Good Luck.


Time flies like lightning, fruit flies like bananas
-philosoRaptor
 

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I kinda disagree. I have an 03 636 and its my first bike. And IMO it has plenty of power throughout the rpm range... Especially after your past 3-5k. Plenty for a beginner. But this is the fastest bike I've ridden so I could be biased.

As far as the OP's question. I say find a friend that has a 600 and see if they'll let her try it. Just maybe around a large parking lot or something. See how she feels. But def MSF and buy her lots of gear. Good Luck.


Time flies like lightning, fruit flies like bananas
-philosoRaptor
I can't say what your bike is like in the rpm range.
If i just shift thru the gears, the 6 is a kitten, to me. But then I might be comparing it to a 14.:lol
I'm sure it has power as does my 600. But it's not the kind of power that would scare a beginner. As some might recommend a 250, I think too low of power can be more frightening than too much. Nothing worse than trying to pass a car or get up to hwy speeds at full throttle all the time.
 

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I recommend the ninja 650r good power range has roughly 58 hp which will be plenty for her. I'm pretty sure you can pick one up for 3,000$.
 

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With about 30 years of experience I tell you that a 250 is plenty powerful for a beginner with no riding experience, it is not about the power but how to really learn to ride and a smaller lighter bike is perfect for that purpose, she will lay it down, no question, but the smaller bikes are easier and cheaper to fix then the bigger ones.
And you need to learn to slow down so she can keep up with you on the smaller bike or make out checkpoints along the route you plan on going and you go ahead if needed and wait sometimes till she catches up with you.
But you could also go with an older 500 or 600 with low power. As I said it is not about how fast you can go someplace but to learn to ride and handle the bike first, to gain confidence and trust in your own abilities with the machine, the speed will increase automatically over time.
People starting out on bigger bikes without any experience are only doing that to show off or trying to "keep up with the Jones" like they say. It is only a recipe for disaster in the making.
Like I said in the beginning a 250 will serve well to begin with and she will have more fun learning that way. She will know when she outgrows it, then you can get something bigger and sell the little bike to another beginner.
By experience I would recommend a year on a small bike at least to learn and practice the basic skills and then upgrading when no more progress can be made.

Just my 2 cents
I agree with everything but the size of the bike. I would have to say a 650R would be a kickass starter bike. Easy to handle, light, fuel injected so you don't have problems with reliability, enough power to be god damn fun for an experienced rider, and enough torque to teach a healthy respect for the throttle without being capable of slamming you into a tree at 160 mph
 

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I'm sure it's all relative. Maybe my opinion would be different if I started on a 600, maybe it would seem faster to me than they do. I was completely comfortable on a 1000 before I rode anything else, and when I finally did ride a 600, I couldn't figure out what all the fuss was about. Like EZ, I found it to be about as tame as can be unless it was getting it's guts wrung out. Sure, they can be crazy fast, but it's not an idle to redline thing. They have to wake up first, and you have to really be trying hard to get them to do so. At least compared to a literbike+.

Concurrently, I'm pretty sure that if my first bike had been a 600, I'd be dead. Nothing about them inspires my respect until it's too late. I knew with my 10R that if I sneezed while shifting at ANY rpm even if it was right off idle I'd be on my ass in the road watching my bike sail off without me, and I respected the hell out of that. Every 600 I've ridden, which is many, are the exact opposite. I immediately forget about anything except how insanely docile they are until you wind them up, and "oops" is probably the last thought I'd have had right before I put one into the woods at triple digits. This is why I say for any responsible adult, a 600 should be the perfect place to start. Nice and light, easy to handle with all the guts of a pissed off moped until you wind it up, and avoiding that is as easy as... not winding it up.
 

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I kinda disagree. I have an 03 636 and its my first bike. And IMO it has plenty of power throughout the rpm range... Especially after your past 3-5k. Plenty for a beginner.
No, we don't want plenty of power for the beginner.
The 07+ ZX6R has 599cc, your's has 636cc. Enough to make a noticeable difference in torque and HP through the lower revs.
We want something a little more tame in the lower revs.
I always agree with the 650R as a beginner.
I still wish I woulda got one as my 1st, instead of the ZX.
 

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I started on a lawnmower tube frame minibike!! Can't get any wimpier than that! I worked my way up from the mower 3 hp motor to a 50cc then a 80cc then a 125 then 450cc then a 600cc, Then a 1203cc then a 1000cc. And i will tell you what, a 600 is pretty big for a YOUNG beginner! A 600 is fine For an adult! Totally different mind sets going on and more knowledge. I prefer to teach my friends and family how to ride off the road! There are way more challenges to off road riding and control and no-one can say it easier than street riding because it is not! I learned more off road than i did on the road. And i still ride off road a lot just to keep up on my control skills when i break traction.

I started riding when i was 5 yrs old when we moved to America! Now i have 30 years riding experience and things will happen and not all good.

This to anyone who thinks they wont lay a bike down or crash BULLSHIT! It will happen it could be a tip over or worse. If you are around\ride motorcycles you will eventually go down! I have been down many times off and on road. I raced motocross for years until i got hurt By someone else. I have hit animals at night and crashed. I have been run off the road and almost killed by others. We get all these cocky young kids talking all this smack like they are the shit on 2 wheels. I wish i could be there to tell I TOLD YOU SO!!

You are only as good as your training and skill\fear allows don't pretend it can't or wont happen!
 

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If she was a young girl getting her first bike, I'd say go with the 250. Even better would be a small dirt bike. They take a licking a keep on going. But a mature woman, her first bike, would probably have a little more respect of the bike and she wouldn't have that male hormone that makes young men want to see just how long they can hold it wide open. With a msf course under her belt, go for the 600 if that's what she wants.
 

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I started on a lawnmower tube frame minibike!! Can't get any wimpier than that! I worked my way up from the mower 3 hp motor to a 50cc then a 80cc then a 125 then 450cc then a 600cc, Then a 1203cc then a 1000cc. And i will tell you what, a 600 is pretty big for a YOUNG beginner! A 600 is fine For an adult! Totally different mind sets going on and more knowledge. I prefer to teach my friends and family how to ride off the road! There are way more challenges to off road riding and control and no-one can say it easier than street riding because it is not! I learned more off road than i did on the road. And i still ride off road a lot just to keep up on my control skills when i break traction.

I started riding when i was 5 yrs old when we moved to America! Now i have 30 years riding experience and things will happen and not all good.

This to anyone who thinks they wont lay a bike down or crash BULLSHIT! It will happen it could be a tip over or worse. If you are around\ride motorcycles you will eventually go down! I have been down many times off and on road. I raced motocross for years until i got hurt By someone else. I have hit animals at night and crashed. I have been run off the road and almost killed by others. We get all these cocky young kids talking all this smack like they are the shit on 2 wheels. I wish i could be there to tell I TOLD YOU SO!!

You are only as good as your training and skill\fear allows don't pretend it can't or wont happen!
YOUNG beginner?
Adult?
What if it's a YOUNG adult?
An OLD beginner?
An old adult can still be considered a beginner.
A person who by virtue of attaining a certain age, generally eighteen, is regarded in the eyes of the law as being able to manage his or her own affairs.

just messin with ya.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yeah she is 33 yrs old and we have a 10 yr old boy. So we have lots to live for and that would probably trump any desire to be stupid on the bike. I agree with the comment on dirt bike riding being harder. There is a reason those pros mx bikers are in ironman shape. I have a crf450x but i cant even stand flat footed on it so it definitely isnt something she could practice on. Besides in the low rpm band it probably has more snot than the 600 sport bikes.
 

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Lol some good points but......Young kids don't fear like adults do. I never did and i did some stupid shit but that's a story for another time.


I still like the little ninja 250's fun little bikes man! I still get teased on my current 250 ninja. But if you come upon me in the twistie on my little ninja watch-out!
 
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