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Discussion Starter #1
Perform at your own risk.

This is a continuation of my war on carbon deposits and is designed to clean the intake valves without removing them from the motor. The result will be valves that are almost completely bare of deposits and therefore able to flow more A/F and HP than before the cleaning.

I've started a simple routine for cleaning that tar looking carbon from my bikes' intake valves. I perform the cleaning as part of my valve clearance checkup, since the intake ports are exposed and I'm already into that process anyway.

So here it is. With the ignition cover off, transmission in neutral, and the spark plugs in, rotate the engine to TDC on 1-4 as you would during a normal valve clearance checkup, making note of which two of the four intake valve sets are closed.
Pour in no more than about 1/2" gasoline* into the closed intakes, submerging the (four) carbon coated valves.**
Let the gasoline marinate with the carbon deposits for at least ten minutes.
Gently scrub the carbon from the submerged valves using some durable hard plastic until you feel no more resistance from the deposits coating the valves. Awkward as it seems, keep scrubbing. The fuel should be nice and soupy by now.
When you are satisfied that all four valves are sufficiently clean, rotate the motor 180 degrees to the other 1-4 TDC mark and repeat the gasoline marinate and cleaning on the other four valves.
While the second set is waiting, repeat the scrubbing of the previous two valve sets to remove any visible deposits that were missed on the first scrubbing. You'll repeat this on the second set after rotating the engine again afterwards.
Lastly, rotate the engine at the crank several times slowly to clear the soupy gasoline from the cylinders. When you are satisfied the engine will not hydro-lock, reassemble the bike and start it up in a well ventilated area and/or take it for a ride to completely clear it out.​

Quite surprisingly, I don't know where all that gasoline goes! I'd imagine there would be a backfire, but I haven't experienced any on either bike. The bikes start and run like there was never any large dose of fuel passed through them.

* The type and grade of gasoline will not matter. If you feel more comfortable with another form of solvent, I'm sure that will work as well as gasoline, if not better from a safety standpoint.
** Perform only in a well ventilated area, free of open flames or other sources that may ignite the fuel.
 

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Great tip! Thanks Man.
Do you access the intake valves by the carb throats? Do you remove'em? Or acess by other way?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great tip! Thanks Man.
Do you access the intake valves by the carb throats? Do you remove'em? Or acess by other way?
With the throttle bodies off, like in this pic, so each of the four intakes ports are completely exposed (not covered by rags either).

They don't come this clean compared to how bad they're originally tarred up, but it is a lot better for sure.
 

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You can do the same thing simply by running the occasional bottle of Techroline in the fuel tank, and you don't have to take anything off. I think it's Phillips 66 premium that has some Techroline additive at the pump. Also good for keeping those pesky idle circuits clean. Seafoam works also, but it's not as concentrated.

The gas that's disappearing down the ports is washing the oil of the cylinder walls and ending up in the crankcase, where, if your lucky, it'll evaporate before it accidentally ignites.
 

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Another good way is to just spray a little water in the intake while it's running.. It'll smoke a little but steam clean the piston heads and the valves at one go. Never had a problem with it. You can also use some ATF to break off the really funky stuff first, then finish with the spritz spray of water. That way you don't get all that fuel and crap into the crank case. It may smoke a little from the ATF and steam from the water but it cleans up nicely.
 

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I used a copper brush and gasoline when I did my head and cams. There was about 2 mm of build up on the pistons and valves.
 

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Another good way is to just spray a little water in the intake while it's running.. It'll smoke a little but steam clean the piston heads and the valves at one go. Never had a problem with it. You can also use some ATF to break off the really funky stuff first, then finish with the spritz spray of water. That way you don't get all that fuel and crap into the crank case. It may smoke a little from the ATF and steam from the water but it cleans up nicely.
Hi,
I've used ATF in the past and nowadays brake fluid mixed 50% with alcohol (some smoke too). You have to do with the engine hot, if not, it won't work. It cleans some, quick and easy, but I don't belive it last as much as mechanicaly removing.

Now I'm going to give one of the contrary guy here, before they do: There is the side of shock cooling the combustions chamber, with the excess cold material (gas+other substances, specially water that has the highest calorific power of all liquids), by removing a lot of heat in a short time. For some, this measure could lead to crack in the head. I'm not sure but there is some risk.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You can do the same thing simply by running the occasional bottle of Techroline in the fuel tank, and you don't have to take anything off. I think it's Phillips 66 premium that has some Techroline additive at the pump. Also good for keeping those pesky idle circuits clean. Seafoam works also, but it's not as concentrated.

The gas that's disappearing down the ports is washing the oil of the cylinder walls and ending up in the crankcase, where, if your lucky, it'll evaporate before it accidentally ignites.
Like I mentioned, I'm already into a process, so another twenty to thirty minutes to physically remove the goop is not really an extra chore. I like the idea of knowing that the gasoline is dissolving and softening the carbon deposits so they can easily be scraped off. That's a result I can see on all eight valves in about 30 minutes.

As for the gas leaking past the piston rings when it didn't leak past the valves at all for approximately 10 minutes, I don't find that to be plausible. I would have to imagine that better than 99% goes out of the exhaust port either in raw or gas form.

Cylinder wall washing isn't a concern either, since the oil film would be quickly replaced during normal mechanical motion as the engine warmed at low RPM and the gas was burned off.

So I'd like to just say that if anyone wants to try Seafoam or ATF or goat urine or water or whatever, that's great. I just thought I'd post up an easy procedure where the carbon deposits could be quickly and positively be removed.
 

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As for the gas leaking past the piston rings when it didn't leak past the valves at all for approximately 10 minutes, I don't find that to be plausible. I would have to imagine that better than 99% goes out of the exhaust port either in raw or gas form.
That would be true if rings were, like valves are, continuous. But they have gaps. Gaps that are big enough for gasoline to leak past



Cylinder wall washing isn't a concern either, since the oil film would be quickly replaced during normal mechanical motion as the engine warmed at low RPM and the gas was burned off.
Most wear occurs on startup, so washed cylinder walls could lead to ring galling and piston scoring.

So I'd like to just say that if anyone wants to try Seafoam or ATF or goat urine or water or whatever, that's great. I just thought I'd post up an easy procedure where the carbon deposits could be quickly and positively be removed.
It doesn't seem that easy to me, but that's just me. The occasional splash of Techroline in the tank (one bottle is enough for three tanks or so) seems a lot easier with none of the risks, if they are that. The results are the same, trust me.

P.S. +1 on the disclaimer at the top of your post.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Goat urine

that sounds like a baaaaad idea.:scared
:crackup Exactly. A ba-a-a-a-a-ad idea.
...It doesn't seem that easy to me, but that's just me. The occasional splash of Techroline in the tank (one bottle is enough for three tanks or so) seems a lot easier with none of the risks, if they are that. The results are the same, trust me...
I'd like to trust what you and the manufacturers are saying, but have you taken a look at your intake valves lately? If you could show me pictures of clean intake valves that would hold a lot more weight than a claim from a bottle.

I perform the cleaning as part of my valve clearance checkup, which means I typically drop the oil shortly thereafter anyway. And I'm not too worried about engine wear for a whole 1,000 revolutions of an engine with almost 48,000 miles now and the fact that fuel is going into the top end as part of the normal A/F mix.

I'm undeterred.
 

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:crackup Exactly. A ba-a-a-a-a-ad idea.
I'd like to trust what you and the manufacturers are saying, but have you taken a look at your intake valves lately? If you could show me pictures of clean intake valves that would hold a lot more weight than a claim from a bottle.

I perform the cleaning as part of my valve clearance checkup, which means I typically drop the oil shortly thereafter anyway. And I'm not too worried about engine wear for a whole 1,000 revolutions of an engine with almost 48,000 miles now and the fact that fuel is going into the top end as part of the normal A/F mix.

I'm undeterred.
+1:clap
 

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You'll have toi take my word for it because I'm not pulling the tank, airbox and carbs off to take a picture to prove it. But if you'll remind me this winter when I have it apart for yearly maintenance, I will. Until then, carry on with your manual method.

It's not a matter of a claim on a bottle, it's been substantiated by research. Google "Techroline" (invented by Chevron chemists) and read all you can find.
 

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I Never used this Techronline. I've tried the STP intake valve cleaner and didn't get a great result. So I became a litte sceptic about bottles.
 

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Most modern fuels (at least in the U. S. can't speak for other countries) now contain a small percentage of techroline. It helps keep the valves clean. But if you have built-up deposits, better to buy a small bottle and use according to directions. The techroline they add at the refinery comes in 32 oz. bottles and treats 750 gallons. I'm told it's thicker than pancake syrup. The stuff you buy in stores comes in 20 oz. bottles and treats 15 gallons, so it's quite a bit less concentrated.
 

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Sure, we have here, also. I use V-Power or Premium from Shell, sometimes Exxon or the Texaco additivated. They also have detergent additives like there in US. It's a great fuel. But if you run on the rich side of peak EGT, there is not way to avoid buildups.
 

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i just spray shit with easy off oven cleaner and call it a day.
 

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I like the idea of easy off oven :crazyloco, but,

shit with easy off? why the mix? just easy off isn't good enought? :headscratch

Kidding, man :lol
 

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im drunk.
leave me alone
purple drank
 

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Not a good idea to be dumping raw fuel down into the cylinder. Sure, a fuel air mix goes in there but it is a mist and not a liquid. Oil cut with gas doesn't help the main bearings one bit either.

I make it a point to not fill my cylinders up gas for those reasons.


If a little is good then a lot should be better........
 
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