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So I installed a new head gasket because I measured my compression back before I took the engine apart, and I was getting significantly lower compression on cylinders 2 & 3 than the other two (AKA two adjacent cylinders). After the head gasket change, one of two of the cylinders jumped to the 90psi range with the others. Yes, I do have a cylinder base gasket. No, I did not get anything machined during my rebuild. I asked a question on this forum about whether or not I would need to get the head machined, and I was told that I did not need to do it because the engine doesn't warp enough for that.

As for the valve lash, I had never heard of this term until now (unless it's just a fancier word for valve clearance). I've seen the manual I'm working with talk about setting valve clearances, but I didn't think is was possible to adjust the clearance (or lash) without individual rocker arms for each valve (or each pair of valves). When you say "wiggle the rockers," are you talking about wiggling the cams, wiggling the cam lobes, or wiggling the camshaft cap? Wiggling the cap for specifically intake or exhaust valves doesn't sound possible because it's one big piece of metal. Oh and when you say "bucket" you're talking about the cam lobes right?

I would hope carbon build up isn't the issue because I lapped my valves before reinstalling them, so they were squeaky clean. There wasn't too much to begin with since the bike only has 14k miles on it. Your explanation makes sense though, so thank you for the detailed response.

I'll take a picture of my timing at the #4 TDC mark, and you guys can tell me if it's off or not. Please let me know if I should take any other pictures.
The reason I was asking about the head being machined or if you were running a base gasket was, I thought you might have been trying to get more HP out of the motor, First thing anyone does thats serious about it has the head machined to bump up the compression ratio, If you get aggressive and grind off 112 thousands or more, you get to a point where you dont drop the cams in per what the book says,
I did that on a 85 zx 900. We did a lot of work on that motor, Falicon lightened the crank, shot peened the rods, web cams, ported the head, 1990 zx 11 valves, shimmed up the valve springs for more open seat pressure, We machiened the cam gears so we could degree the cams, No base gasket, punched / bored the cylinder and went as big as we could with some wiseco pistons as well ran a billet clutch basket etc etc etc,
I know I know, Wiseco doent know what round means but I had a shitload of money into it and $1000 set of pistons was out of the question so I went with Weiscos. The piston kit came with a cylinder head gasket. That dam gasket must have been 3/16". Leave it to Weisco to avoid any issues with piston to valve clearances with their big bore Hi Comp pistons by supplying a ridiculously thick head gasket so the pistons and valves could not possibly touch.

Any of the machining we did would be for nothing if we used that head gasket. I bought an OEM head gasket and had to remove a small amount of material in the cylinder holes because the OEM head gasket cylinder holes aren't as big as the amount we punched out the cylinders for the weisco pistons. We got it running good but my compression numbers were like 160 psi, I remember we were having trouble degreeing the cams and couldn't get it to where we wanted it. I cant remember why but we had to get back into the top end and after carefully inspecting everything just off of a visual we dropped the cams in wrong, the factory marks were redundant because we took so much material off the head + no base gasket the factory marks dropped below where you could see them, What I saw that caught my eye was the cam lobes for the intake and exhaust were not 180 degrees opposing one in other, But the factory index marks were correct. We dropped the cams in 1 tooth difference and the lobes looked like they were supposed to be, But the cam gear index marks looked wrong. We re degree the cams it and got it locked in at ??????? I can't remember but it was where it needed to be,
My compression numbers were now at 205 psi in every hole. That bike now ran like a raped ape. Dyno pulls were in the 140 HP range, Stock was 85 HP.

Thats why I asked you about machining the head + no base gasket, Your compression number are low and was trying to establish where your cams were installed,
LOL reg Lash / Clearance, I think Valve clearance sounds way more scientific and correct, Lash is the term my car gearhead guy friends and my dad use. But yes were talking about the same thing. And yes, the buckets are the pocket at the top of the valve stems where the shim or tappet goes to obtain the correct valve clearance.
I was asking if at top dead center you could wiggle or move the rockers up and down at all was to determine if there was in fact some clearance and an incorrect adjustment had the valve hanging open and causing to low compression numbers because what you got going on is not right.

Also to just make it easier I suggested you remove the cams to remove that from the mix as a clearance problem and do the leakdown test again, also it with the cams removed it would make it a lot easier to tap the shim or tappet in the bucket to see if that helps the amount of leakdown. If you did all that and had dam near zero leakdown We could assume you need to lash the valves correctly with proper shims and your problems would be solved.
\
 

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The olde English motorcycle forum I frequent has a complete English/American dictionary so the two sides of the pond can effectively communicate without (too much) confusion.

Motorcycle = Motorbike
Plug wire = HT (High Tension) lead
Rim lock = Security bolt
Wrench = Spanner
Fender = Mudguard
Triple tree = Yoke
Ground = Earth
Fork tube = Stanchion
Gear shift = Gear change
Muffler = Silencer
Gasoline = Petrol
Petcock = Petrol/Fuel tap
Wrist pin = Gudgeon pin
Zerk fitting = Grease nipple
Lifters = Tappets
Counterclockwise = Anticlockwise
Bushing/s = Bush/es
Snap ring = Circlip
Footpeg = Footrest
Transmission = Gearbox
License plate = Number plate
Kerosene = Paraffin
Axle = Spindle
Denatured alcohol = Methylated spirit (or "meths")
High beam = Main beam
Low beam = Dipped (or Dip) beam
Blinkers/Flashers/Turn signals = (Direction) Indicators
Set screw = Grub screw (as a "set screw" in the UK is a fully threaded bolt with a hexagon head)
Tube wrench = Box spanner
Box-end wrench = Ring spanner
Allen wrench = Allen key
Adjustable wrench = "Adjustable" (spanner) or "Shifter"
Vise grip = Mole grip
Breaking-in = Running-in
Flashlight = Torch
Pinging = Pinking
Hose clamp = Jubilee clip
Bondo = Body filler
Rim band = Rim tape
Headlamp bucket = Headlamp shell
Lever perch = Lever bracket
Fiberglass = GRP (Glass Reinforced Plastic)/Fibreglass
Pry = Prise
Vise = Vice
Kickstand = Side stand
Tire iron/spoon = Tyre lever
DC generator = Dynamo
Lash=Clearance_
(y)
 

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I'm building a 2mm overbore ZG1000 with ZRX1100 pistons, not going as wild as yours just swapping the tiny Concours cams and carbs for GPZ900 units. Didn't know about the ZX11 valves being suitable, no problems with the seats? Have any parts left over?
 

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I'm building a 2mm overbore ZG1000 with ZRX1100 pistons, not going as wild as yours just swapping the tiny Concours cams and carbs for GPZ900 units. Didn't know about the ZX11 valves being suitable, no problems with the seats? Have any parts left over?
We used the zx 11 valves because they were 1 gram lighter than stock 900 valves. I did this when I was 26 years old, Im 57 now so , No SIr no extra parts laying around.
We were trying to make as much HP as we could on a reasonable budget. There were some frankenstein things that required critical testing to get some measurements. Critical testing is a relevant term and is defined by how expensive the testing equipment is. We needed pretty precise numbers and we did it as best we could. Keep reading.
We didnt know if where we wanted to degree the cams at considering the amount of lift and duration those cam shafts had would have enough piston to valve clearance so on the bench we assembled the bottom end then the top end. In cylinders 1 and 3 we packed Silly Putty in the head chambers and a thin coat of 3 in one oil on the pistons, dropped the cams in straight up where the factory said to. By hand we rolled the motor over 4 revolutions and yanked the head off. Then carefully got the silly putty out and carefully sectioned it apart just to get the real piston to valve clearance measurement.
Looking back at all this I must have really loved that bike.
The net result was precise measured compression of 12.9 to 1. Those bikes came with built in cooling issues from the factory, What we did didnt help that.
I now remember forming up some aluminium pieces that came off the front of the radiator to help catch more air and force it into the rad, Also had a switch that turned the fan on manually.
 

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We used the zx 11 valves because they were 1 gram lighter than stock 900 valves. I did this when I was 26 years old, Im 57 now so , No SIr no extra parts laying around.
We were trying to make as much HP as we could on a reasonable budget. There were some frankenstein things that required critical testing to get some measurements. Critical testing is a relevant term and is defined by how expensive the testing equipment is. We needed pretty precise numbers and we did it as best we could. Keep reading.
We didnt know if where we wanted to degree the cams at considering the amount of lift and duration those cam shafts had would have enough piston to valve clearance so on the bench we assembled the bottom end then the top end. In cylinders 1 and 3 we packed Silly Putty in the head chambers and a thin coat of 3 in one oil on the pistons, dropped the cams in straight up where the factory said to. By hand we rolled the motor over 4 revolutions and yanked the head off. Then carefully got the silly putty out and carefully sectioned it apart just to get the real piston to valve clearance measurement.
Looking back at all this I must have really loved that bike.
The net result was precise measured compression of 12.9 to 1. Those bikes came with built in cooling issues from the factory, What we did didnt help that.
I now remember forming up some aluminium pieces that came off the front of the radiator to help catch more air and force it into the rad, Also had a switch that turned the fan on manually.
I know about that cooling issue. Found some coolant in the oil on this thing and after splitting the cases still haven't found where it leaked. I went ahead and got a ChiCom aluminum radiator from Aliexpress hoping that helps.
 

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I know about that cooling issue. Found some coolant in the oil on this thing and after splitting the cases still haven't found where it leaked. I went ahead and got a ChiCom aluminum radiator from Aliexpress hoping that helps.
Yes hopefully that new rad will do the trick, 1984 that was the first year and biggest water cooled bike.
Kawi grossly underestimated the size of the radiator. The only way I could see to get a larger radiator to fit would be to make it thicker, but if you made it thicker by going out the front of the unit the extension would have to be 1 1/2 shorter to clear the lower triple tree. Or relocate the oil cooler and make the new rad taller. I dont know how much money that would have cost to have made but it was more than I could afford in 1992.
Good luck on your build Bro.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
It's been a while since I've been able to get to the garage and knock out some testing, but I was able to get to it tonight, and I found that I had zero clearance in almost all my valves. 4 valves had some clearance, but it was too tight. Only 2 valves had clearance within a good range.

I did want to ask about the right time to check the clearance before I get to swapping things around. What I mean by this is that I get different clearances at both #1 TDC timing mark rotations. Here's the order I was working in:
1. Line up the #4 piston at TDC, and the IN and EX marks on the cams are properly in line with the cylinder head.
2. Measure clearances for the valves that are open according to manual.
3. Rotate timing marks 360 degrees (cams rotate 180 degrees), and line up the #1 piston at TDC.
4. Measure clearances for the valves that are open (1 & 3 intake valves and 1 & 2 exhaust valves).
5. Repeat step 3 and line up #1 piston at TDC (IN and EX marks are almost in line with the cylinder head again).
6. Valves that were open in step 4 are now all closed.

I would assume I am only supposed to measure the clearances on the rotation where the valves are supposed to be open right? Aka I measure the clearances on step 4 not step 6.

Also to just make it easier I suggested you remove the cams to remove that from the mix as a clearance problem and do the leakdown test again, also it with the cams removed it would make it a lot easier to tap the shim or tappet in the bucket to see if that helps the amount of leakdown. If you did all that and had dam near zero leakdown We could assume you need to lash the valves correctly with proper shims and your problems would be solved.
Depending on what answer I get to my questions above, I'll for sure give this a shot next. Thanks for the advice. Now that the girlfriend's out of town I'll have time to work on my bike more often haha.
 

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It took me some time to get a handle on lashing the valve clearances with bikes and cars. Don't overthink it like I used to.
Get out a piece of paper and draw 4 circles in a row, write in 1 2 3 4 in each hole, then draw 2 smaller holes on the top and 2 on the bottom of each of the big holes. write in your measurements as you go thru the process. And you do know there will be an absolute max and min clearance and they will be different for the intakes and the exhaust. the exhaust valves will start and end with a a bigger gap, this is due to the extra heat and the metal expansion.
I like to run my motors at the maximum or biggest clearance set by Kawi. It will be a little noisy when its running but a valve is better to run to lose then tight. The feeler gauge will have to have a little muscle to get it in there,
Good rule of thumb is it will take some grunt to get the gauge in but you will not be able to get the next size bigger feeler gauge in the gap.
#1. always rotate the motor in the direction it does when its running. Bring the motor around until you line up the timing mark . You want to measure when your on the heel of the cam, Meaning the opposite side of the lobe or when the valve is closed. for whats going on with your motor you want the cam lobes pointing straight up on the valves your measuring.
#2. I dont know what valves are going to be closed ( lobes pointing straight up ) but just look at valve train and it will be obvious.
#3. rotate the motor 180 degrees and measure those valves,
#4. rotate the motor 180 degrees and measure those valves
then again then again. You will have done all of them at this point.
You will have all your measurements and know what shims to purchase.

If you really have some that are at zero lash you are going to have to make some assumptions of what shims to buy ahead of time, yank the cams install shims then reinstall the cams. Hopefully you will have a clearance and you need to do the above process again just to know what shims you will need when its all said and done.,

Zero lash is a bad thing in the bike world. Those cam shafts and this been discussed here, are only hardened on the lobes. For this reason is why to run the motor at zero lash it doesn't take long and the heel of the cam will start to disintegrate, then you are running small micro chips of metal through the motor, And when this start happening its but 100 or so miles and the cams will be junk and the rockers and more then likely the bearing will have started to be chewed up as well. motor is done,
hope this makes sense and is helpful.
 

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Also Nester, Do you know what you did wrong if your girlfriend keep coming out to the garage and hasseling you about working on the bike??????????????


You left too much slack on her chain.
 

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A bike that has been running that tight probably needs the head off for inspection with valve lapping or regrinding. That's my opinion, I don't like doing jobs twice.
Edit:. Just thought about this: pull the cams and then do a leak down test. You can even do it with the pistons at BDC, won't matter. If you hear hissing then the head comes off b/c one or more valves are burnt, warped, etc. If not you're in luck and just re-shim, keep a log of each valve shim's size as you can swap them around to save on shims.

Just thinking out loud. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Good rule of thumb is it will take some grunt to get the gauge in but you will not be able to get the next size bigger feeler gauge in the gap.
Hang on. If you have to force in the feeler gauges, then aren't you compressing the valve springs and getting an inaccurate reading? I thought it was just supposed to be by "feel." When it feels like it's getting tight then you're good.

Going to re-measure the clearances and then pull the cams and do a leak down test. I'll report back tomorrow with results.
 

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Hang on. If you have to force in the feeler gauges, then aren't you compressing the valve springs and getting an inaccurate reading? I thought it was just supposed to be by "feel." When it feels like it's getting tight then you're good.

Going to re-measure the clearances and then pull the cams and do a leak down test. I'll report back tomorrow with results.
Yes its going to fit real tight Nester, To force so hard as to compress the spring, the gauge will start to fold first,
Remember what I said, Yes your going to have to work it in there. When you can not get the next size gauge in , your real measurement was the one before.
Ok Man, let us know.!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Ok so I just finished leak down testing without the cams, and here are my results. I couldn't get 100psi into the cylinders, but I measured once at 90 and again at 75. I also tried tapping the buckets with the wooden handle of a hammer, but that didn't change anything.

Cylinder 1:
In with 90psi, held 84psi (7% leakage)
Cylinder 2:
In with 90psi, held 87psi (3% leakage)
Cylinder 3:
In with 90psi, held 87psi (3% leakage)
Cylinder 4:
In with 90psi, held 86psi (4% leakage)

So based on this, can I go ahead and assume it's valve clearances? Is a 7% leakage in cylinder 1 a cause of concern?
 

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Well that's great news for you !!!!!!!
It would be great if you did the leakdown test with the cams in prior to this LD test.
However those numbers are pretty damn good numbers, Even 7 % is good on a street motor. Im surprised the % didn't drop when you were tapping the valves.
Could you tell where that air was escaping ???

In any event, The next step is to go out and buy a shim kit, drop the cams in and lash the valves.
Remember you need to establish a number on those valves that you say had zero cleanance to know the correct shims to run.

Do you think your motor was run very long with the zero clearance???
Do your cams have any abnormal looking wear on the heel?
Good Job Brother,,,,,,
Let us know what happens?
 

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Ok so I just finished leak down testing without the cams, and here are my results. I couldn't get 100psi into the cylinders, but I measured once at 90 and again at 75. I also tried tapping the buckets with the wooden handle of a hammer, but that didn't change anything.

Cylinder 1:
In with 90psi, held 84psi (7% leakage)
Cylinder 2:
In with 90psi, held 87psi (3% leakage)
Cylinder 3:
In with 90psi, held 87psi (3% leakage)
Cylinder 4:
In with 90psi, held 86psi (4% leakage)

So based on this, can I go ahead and assume it's valve clearances? Is a 7% leakage in cylinder 1 a cause of concern?
Seems good to me for an engine with mileage. Search Amazon for a hotcams shim set.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Do you think your motor was run very long with the zero clearance???
Do your cams have any abnormal looking wear on the heel?
Good Job Brother,,,,,,
Let us know what happens?
I couldn't tell where the air was escaping, but it sounded like it was escaping through the valves and not through the rings or the head gasket. I didn't see any abnormal wear on any cams. They all looked good. I also don't know how long it was run on zero clearance. When the guy I bought the bike from started it it ran fine, but as soon as I brought it home I noticed the low compression. Maybe the last time he took it to a shop they didn't readjust the valves? I don't know but there wasn't any damage to the valve faces nor the pistons, so lucky it didn't cause any serious damage.

Seems good to me for an engine with mileage. Search Amazon for a hotcams shim set.
Got it right away. $70 on Ebay. The only problem is that I might need more than just 3 of one size, so I'll see what to do about that. I read on another thread that guys traded shims with Kawasaki dealers to get the right ones.

Just out of curiosity, why do the valve clearances need to be adjusted after every time you take the cams out? Is it because the engine operation causes the valves to get seated in a certain way, and then once you remove the cams you've changed that perfect fitment?
 

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I couldn't tell where the air was escaping, but it sounded like it was escaping through the valves and not through the rings or the head gasket. I didn't see any abnormal wear on any cams. They all looked good. I also don't know how long it was run on zero clearance. When the guy I bought the bike from started it it ran fine, but as soon as I brought it home I noticed the low compression. Maybe the last time he took it to a shop they didn't readjust the valves? I don't know but there wasn't any damage to the valve faces nor the pistons, so lucky it didn't cause any serious damage.



Got it right away. $70 on Ebay. The only problem is that I might need more than just 3 of one size, so I'll see what to do about that. I read on another thread that guys traded shims with Kawasaki dealers to get the right ones.

Just out of curiosity, why do the valve clearances need to be adjusted after every time you take the cams out? Is it because the engine operation causes the valves to get seated in a certain way, and then once you remove the cams you've changed that perfect fitment?
If this were my bike and a keeper I would take the head off and lap the valves, total cost a lapping tool, compound, and head gasket (and time) but that's me, don't do this if you don't want. :) Have never heard of new shims needed after cams loosened with a bike already in spec but a recheck is logical.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
If this were my bike and a keeper I would take the head off and lap the valves, total cost a lapping tool, compound, and head gasket (and time) but that's me, don't do this if you don't want. :)
Funny you should say that because I already lapped all the valves. I wanted to make sure everything was nice and shiny before reassembling. I guess my work over in the cylinder with 7% leakage wasn't very professional haha.
 

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I couldn't tell where the air was escaping, but it sounded like it was escaping through the valves and not through the rings or the head gasket. I didn't see any abnormal wear on any cams. They all looked good. I also don't know how long it was run on zero clearance. When the guy I bought the bike from started it it ran fine, but as soon as I brought it home I noticed the low compression. Maybe the last time he took it to a shop they didn't readjust the valves? I don't know but there wasn't any damage to the valve faces nor the pistons, so lucky it didn't cause any serious damage.

If the motor was run for any significant amount of time there would be noticeable marks on the heel of the cams, As mentioned Kawis have a reputation of sometimes having a tempermental valve train.
Some people might not agree with that but 2 bikes of mine, 85
zx 900, and 98 zx 11 both had the same problem with the valves getting tight, Ideally when the bike is new you come up on your 1st valve inspect and adjust and they will move some, but after they stay put for the duration, Ive never herd of them within 14 k miles coming so far out of adjustment that the bike wont run, I dont know why some people do what they do, Some people are just dumb or take bad advice.
Maybe the previous owner came up on the 1st valve adjustment tried to do it himself and fucked it up, And for whatever reason sold it. I mean that seems
highly doubtful though. So whatever you do on this bike be looking for other issues, Also I dont think most dealer wrenches would even have a qualified guy to adjust them.
I myself would never get as lucky as it appears you have. How much did you pay for the bike ?



Got it right away. $70 on Ebay. The only problem is that I might need more than just 3 of one size, so I'll see what to do about that. I read on another thread that guys traded shims with Kawasaki dealers to get the right ones.

Just out of curiosity, why do the valve clearances need to be adjusted after every time you take the cams out? Is it because the engine operation causes the valves to get seated in a certain way, and then once you remove the cams you've changed that perfect fitment?
That should not be the case at all.


If this were my bike and a keeper I would take the head off and lap the valves, total cost a lapping tool, compound, and head gasket (and time) but that's me, don't do this if you don't want. :) Have never heard of new shims needed after cams loosened with a bike already in spec but a recheck is logical.
Now I dont know who this guy is but by reading him he seems sharp and has been around the block a few times. I would fully agree with what he's suggesting to do. You not going to find a better time to lap the valves,,,,,,, LOL "Lap" not Lash. Yank the head off again and with a sharpie on the underside of the head (remember it's the opposite looking at it from the bottom, mark cylinder 1,2,3,4, then intake #1 and #2, then exh #1 and #2. next to the valves . Get a fairly sturdy piece of cardboard or plywood or sheet of thin steel and punch holes in whatever you use, With a sharpie label the cylinder and what valve just like you did the head, pull the valves out of the head and put them in those holes of your jig,
its important to get the same valve back into the hole it came from in the head. go get some
lapping compound and a tool. The tool is a 1/2 thick round, maybe 8 inches long piece of wood, on each end there will be a rubber suction cup thingy. clean the surface of the head real good with carb or brake cleaner. Get the valve pockets especially the seats clean, get your valves, 1 at a time and put 3 small dabs of the compound, 1 at 12 oclock, 1 at 4 and 1 at 8, suction the face of the valve to your tool and insert it into the valve pocket, then with both open hands in a your making a fire, go back and forth fast and grind that valve in to the seat, apply some light to medium pressure, and do like 6/ 7 sets back and forth per valve, Then clean the head off even cleaner then before. along with each valve. put the valves back into your jig until your ready to assemble. I guess you will need a spring compressor tool to to remove and reinstall the valves in the head.

Also then would be the time to find some valve spring shims to install under the springs, They will give you a little more closed and open valve seat pressure,
It's just some cheap insurance to keep the valves from coming into contact with the pistons at 12 k.

Go get her done and let us know. You
should be on the back tire before too long.

You do all that and your leakdown test will be at 0 % loss.
 

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That should not be the case at all.




Now I dont know who this guy is but by reading him he seems sharp and has been around the block a few times. I would fully agree with what he's suggesting to do. You not going to find a better time to lap the valves,,,,,,, LOL "Lap" not Lash. Yank the head off again and with a sharpie on the underside of the head (remember it's the opposite looking at it from the bottom, mark cylinder 1,2,3,4, then intake #1 and #2, then exh #1 and #2. next to the valves . Get a fairly sturdy piece of cardboard or plywood or sheet of thin steel and punch holes in whatever you use, With a sharpie label the cylinder and what valve just like you did the head, pull the valves out of the head and put them in those holes of your jig,
its important to get the same valve back into the hole it came from in the head. go get some
lapping compound and a tool. The tool is a 1/2 thick round, maybe 8 inches long piece of wood, on each end there will be a rubber suction cup thingy. clean the surface of the head real good with carb or brake cleaner. Get the valve pockets especially the seats clean, get your valves, 1 at a time and put 3 small dabs of the compound, 1 at 12 oclock, 1 at 4 and 1 at 8, suction the face of the valve to your tool and insert it into the valve pocket, then with both open hands in a your making a fire, go back and forth fast and grind that valve in to the seat, apply some light to medium pressure, and do like 6/ 7 sets back and forth per valve, Then clean the head off even cleaner then before. along with each valve. put the valves back into your jig until your ready to assemble. I guess you will need a spring compressor tool to to remove and reinstall the valves in the head.

Also then would be the time to find some valve spring shims to install under the springs, They will give you a little more closed and open valve seat pressure,
It's just some cheap insurance to keep the valves from coming into contact with the pistons at 12 k.

Go get her done and let us know. You
should be on the back tire before too long.

You do all that and your leakdown test will be at 0 % loss.
He says he lapped the valves already. Then the zero lash issue? I'm lost now. Unless lapping closed up the clearances and didn't recheck.
 
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