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That price sounds way too high. Probably don’t want to touch older bikes so they price way high.
I do work for a small circle of people (riding buddies and friends they refer). Most of it is just like this type of work.
I stripped two H1 motors in an afternoon (approx. 4-5 hours) and will assemble them in probably 10-12 hours each. Once I have all the bearings (last shipment actually came today), I will assemble the first motor.
If you figure in the actual shop rates (locally here=$135/hour) that works out to $2295 in labour. Parts are like unicorn poop so not sure what they would do? Took me 1.5 years to source all the bearings for two motors.
If you have the mechanical abilities, I would do the rebuild yourself. JMO.
Good luck!!
 

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An aside. An hourly rate of $135/hour! I live in the UK and using the current exchange rate that equates to £104/hour. Typical workshop rates here in the UK are around £40/hour. Here in the UK we have a saying: "Rip off UK" because we are always screwed when it comes to the cost of things. However, looking at hourly rates of $135 I'm starting to wonder if the US is going the same way: "Rip Off US".

I think it's why a lot of us do our own work on bikes, because the cost of employing someone else does not make economic sense. Even at UK rates of ~£40/hour employing a professional mechanic to rebuild an engine would only make sense on a collector's bike, unless the bike has sentimental value.

I'm with ninjanut and would consider doing the rebuild yourself. It might take you a lot longer but a worthwhile exercise, particularly if you can a friend helping you. Here in the UK we have workshop manuals called Haynes Manuals, which are always worth owning. They tend to be a bit more friendly than workshop manuals, but in Section 2 provide detailed step by step instructions on engine assembly and disassembly.

However you decide, good luck. ... $135/hour - I'm in the wrong job!
 

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Problem with the labour rate is that the mechanic gets $25-30 of that. Shop gets the rest. $135 is what a dealer shop charges. Smaller shops are cheaper but tough to find a trustworthy one willing to work in 25-30 year old bikes. I work on them in my shop but I quote work on actual time basis as I do not have an overhead cost like dealers and some shops. Also a part time gig for me and I work on friends and referrals only.
 

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Problem with the labour rate is that the mechanic gets $25-30 of that. Shop gets the rest. $135 is what a dealer shop charges. Smaller shops are cheaper but tough to find a trustworthy one willing to work in 25-30 year old bikes. I work on them in my shop but I quote work on actual time basis as I do not have an overhead cost like dealers and some shops. Also a part time gig for me and I work on friends and referrals only.
Local shop that I bring my forks to have rebuilt and whatever bike I've given up on to get running has a sign in the office that says "If you're bike is over 20 years old, the hourly rate is $120/hr NO MATTER HOW "CLEAN" YOU SAY IT IS!"
 

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Local shop that I bring my forks to have rebuilt and whatever bike I've given up on to get running has a sign in the office that says "If you're bike is over 20 years old, the hourly rate is $120/hr NO MATTER HOW "CLEAN" YOU SAY IT IS!"
I can understand that completely. There is definitely a wide range of what people consider clean!
 

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Only economical way of rebuilding 30 year old machines is doing it yourself. Most guys won’t touch these for fear of damaging something that is literally impossible to source.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
anyone have "cockpit" pics of the 1990 Muzzy bike, I'm curios to see the triple clamp...
 

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Discussion Starter #51
I'm having a tough time deciding.... I have the PM wheels, and some inverted forks from an RC51 that look fairly similar to the WP forks. I have a titanium Muzzy pipe that I plan to install up high like the race bike. I also have the solo race tail from Airtech. I plan on riding this on the street, is I will be using mirrors, turn signals, lights etc. I also have all of the original OEM wheels forks, etc.
 

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I'm having a tough time deciding.... I have the PM wheels, and some inverted forks from an RC51 that look fairly similar to the WP forks. I have a titanium Muzzy pipe that I plan to install up high like the race bike. I also have the solo race tail from Airtech. I plan on riding this on the street, is I will be using mirrors, turn signals, lights etc. I also have all of the original OEM wheels forks, etc.
I vote for the setup and color scheme of the racebike. Minus the sponsor decals. Looks sweet.
 

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PMs, USD forks, and Muzzy high pipe gets my vote.

I love the restomod look.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Cool pipe angle. Never thought there was an issue with the usual mounting but the usual looks odd compared to that nice smooth inline look.

Paying a mechanic you are not getting a steal of a deal from for anything more than the odd specialist job is not possible in the world of repairing motorcycles. The majority of the work is not difficult but it is time consuming. Having recently rebuilt a 1990's car I have to say working on cars is much easier. Motorcycles for the most part are really not difficult outside of a full motor rebuild and then you just have to take your time. Most mechanics hate modern full faired sport bikes too since it is hours to get at the goodies.
 
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