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Discussion Starter #1
So, one of my forks leaks since I trailered the bike from Cali to OH. I must have had the straps too tight. I was going to upgrade the springs anyway, since I'm 220 and they stocks are set for 150, or so I've read. From surfing around the forums, it looks like what I need to do is remove the forks from the bike, and send them to Traxxion Dynamics. They will replace the innards of the shocks with parts more suited to my weight, where I ride, etc, and replace the springs with ones for my weight.

Is that what folks do generally, or are there better ways to go?

Eagle
 

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So, one of my forks leaks since I trailered the bike from Cali to OH. I must have had the straps too tight. I was going to upgrade the springs anyway, since I'm 220 and they stocks are set for 150, or so I've read. From surfing around the forums, it looks like what I need to do is remove the forks from the bike, and send them to Traxxion Dynamics. They will replace the innards of the shocks with parts more suited to my weight, where I ride, etc, and replace the springs with ones for my weight.

Is that what folks do generally, or are there better ways to go?

Eagle
You might look at Race Tech.
 

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If you aren't going to do it yourself, which requires a special spring removal tool, either of those places are good.
 

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Traxxion is my favorite place to get forks rebuilt. EVERY time I send a set they return professionally done and already preset damn close to, if not, perfect for me. Could not recommend them any higher. I've had 3 sets done by them so far. You will be pleased. Can't speak to any other company. :thumb up
For them to rebuild, respring, revalve both compression and rebound was around $800. Well worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Anybody know of a "how-to" to remove/install the forks to do this?
 

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Quinton Phuckin Tarantino
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I don't know of a how to but I've done it before , it seems pretty strait forward . There are a few members who have done this before who could help.
 

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I just got my fork springs replaced yesterday for the same reason (I weigh more than 150 lbs). I also considered doing it myself but you do need a few specialized ($$) tools in order to do this properly and I didn't want to f*ck it up. I bought the springs, oil seals and dust seals from Race Tech and then found a local suspension shop to install everything and set the forks up for my weight. They charged $160 in labour which I thought was quite reasonable. Rode it for the first time today and am very please with the setup so far.
 

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Forgot to add... in answer to your question, taking the forks off the bike yourself will save you some money and it is very straightforward (if I can do it - anyone can - seriously...). You will need front/rear stands, and the front stand has to be the type that lifts the bike from under the triple clamps. Contrary to the service manual, you do NOT need to remove the mid-fairings for this job.

Before you lift the bike, loosen the pinch bolts at the bottom of the forks and loosen the front axle bolt (so you're not torquing on it while the bike is in the air). I use the back end of a spark plug socket for this rather than buying a giant hex tool. At this point I also removed my front fender (comes off easy - 4 bolts plus 3 plastic retaining rings that hold the brake hoses to the fender).

Once the bike is off the ground, remove the brake calipers (4 bolts). Make sure your hex tool is firmly seated in the caliper bolt heads before you torque on them (they are made of softish material which strips out easily).

Now pull out the front axle bolt and remove the front wheel. Use a piece of wire or something to hold up the brake calipers (so they aren't stressing the brake hoses by hanging from them).

Next, remove the plastic trim piece that reside on the underside of the front fairing (1 hex screw and 2 of those pop-out fasteners - push in the center and they come out). At this point you will be able to access the 4 bolts on the lower triple clamps. They are 10mm bolts and I recommend using a wrench to loosen these rather than a socket because it's a bit tight in there. You will need a flashlight for this.

Once the lower triple clamp bolts are loose, loosen the pinch bolts on the upper triple clamp (one of each side). In order to reach these, I had to loosen the bolts that hold the clutch and brake lever assemblies to the handle bars and move them out of the way.

Very Important: before removing the fork tubes, make a note of the position of the tubes relative to the triple clamp. You will need to know this when you put the forks back on. I have bar risers on my bike so I used a vernier caliper with a depth gauge to measure from the top of the handle bar bracket down to the top of the fork cap. The position of the fork tubes in the triple clamps has a HUGE effect on the way the bike handles so you want to get this right.

At this point, simply grab hold of the upper fork tubes from underneath and twist them while pulling down. They will come right out of there although they are a very snug fit.

After the forks come back from your suspension tuner, reverse the process. Once the tubes are back in the triple clamps, use the measurements you made before to get the forks back in the right position. Make sure both sides are exactly the same! Once they're good, tighten the upper and lower triple clamp bolts. Be very careful not to overtighten these bolts as they are threaded into aluminum! Re-position and tighten the brake/clutch lever assemblies, put the front wheel back on, mount the brake calipers, re-install the trim piece under the fairing nose, put the fender back on and you're ready to ride. If your tuner has set the forks up correctly for your weight, the preload, rebound and compression should be in the ball park.

I'm no expert, but I just did this procedure and it worked well so if you need help please ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I just got my fork springs replaced yesterday for the same reason (I weigh more than 150 lbs). I also considered doing it myself but you do need a few specialized ($$) tools in order to do this properly and I didn't want to f*ck it up. I bought the springs, oil seals and dust seals from Race Tech and then found a local suspension shop to install everything and set the forks up for my weight. They charged $160 in labour which I thought was quite reasonable. Rode it for the first time today and am very please with the setup so far.
Sounds like a plan. I looked at RT's website, and it claims my rate should be 1.138, so I'm going with the 1.1's. Add the fork seals and dust seals (what I guess is damaged on mine) and fork oil.

The only other thing they show is the fork valve kits. Not sure which one is right for me, so I'll have to call them Tuesday.

(edit: my phone was messed up when i tried to call them)
 

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Not sure what's up with that. I just tried the number and it works from here. As to the fork valves ("gold" valves and such), I didn't opt for this because it was over my budget. I don't know if these things are worth the extra $$ or not, but maybe others here can offer an opinion on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Not impressed with RaceTec so far. Called and guy said he was busy, he asked if he could call back. Sure. Waited an hour, nothing. I called them back, and sat on hold for 10 min before giving up.
 

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I know a few guys who have used TD's services and I haven't heard one complaint regarding customer service.
 
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